Open Access

Ethnozoology in Brazil: current status and perspectives

Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine20117:22

DOI: 10.1186/1746-4269-7-22

Received: 27 April 2011

Accepted: 18 July 2011

Published: 18 July 2011

Abstract

Ancient connections between animals and human are seen in cultures throughout the world in multiple forms of interaction with the local fauna that form the core of Ethnozoology. Historically, ethnozoological publications grew out of studies undertaken in academic areas such as zoology, human ecology, sociology and anthropology - reflecting the interdisciplinary character of this discipline. The rich fauna and cultural diversity found in Brazil, with many different species of animals being used for an extremely wide diversity of purposes by Amerindian societies (as well as the descendents of the original European colonists and African slaves), presents an excellent backdrop for examining the relationships that exist between humans and other animals. This work presents a historical view of ethnozoological research in Brazil and examines its evolution, tendencies, and future perspectives. In summary, literature researches indicated that ethnozoology experienced significant advances in recent years in Brazil, although from a qualitative point of view improvement is still needed in terms of methodological procedures, taxonomic precision, and the use of quantitative techniques. A wide range of methodologies and theories are available in different areas of learning that can be put to good use in ethnozoological approaches if the right questions are asked. The challenges to studying ethnozoology in Brazil are not insignificant, and the tendencies described in the present study may aid in defining research strategies that will maintain the quantitative growth observed in the recent years but likewise foster needed qualitative improvements.

Introduction

There have been extremely close connections of dependence and co-dependence between humans and animals throughout history [17]. Research suggests that humans evolved from a vegetarian lifestyle to the one including meat in their diets around 2.5 million years ago (at the dawn of the genus Homo) [8, 9], though just how much of the prehistoric diet included animals is difficult to tell from archeological evidence [10]. Up until around 12,000 years ago, humans derived food and raw materials from wild animals and plants [11]. Other evidence of ancient human-animal relationships can be seen in rock paintings that depict wild animals such as bison, horses and deer with human figures hunting them. This sort of evidence corroborates the observation of Marques [12] that human-animal interactions have constituted basic connections in all societies throughout history.

The variety of interactions (both past and present) that human cultures maintain with animals is the subject matter of Ethnozoology, a science that has its roots as deep within the past as the first relationships between humans and other animals. According to Sax [13], human attitudes towards animals probably evolved long before our first attempts to portray them artistically or examine them scientifically. In this sense, it has been speculated that the origin of ethnozoology coincides with the appearance of humans as a species or, perhaps more correctly, with the first contacts between our species and other animals [14]. This view of ethnozoology assumes that these interactions are an integral part of human culture and society.

The rich fauna and cultural diversity found in Brazil, with many different species of animals being used for an extremely wide diversity of purposes by Amerindian societies (as well as the descendents of the original European colonists and African slaves), presents an excellent backdrop for examining the relationships that exist between humans and other animals. The first records and contributions to ethnozoology were produced by early naturalists and explorers who demonstrated interest in the fauna as well as the zoological knowledge of native residents. These naturalists generally compiled lists of native animals together with their regional and scientific names and descriptions of their uses [15]. Nevertheless, the scientific research in the area has been intensifying in recent years, and Brazil is currently one of the most important sources of scientific production in this area.

The history of ethnozoology cannot be separated from the history of zoology, and the first records and contributions to this discipline were produced by naturalists and explorers. Historically, ethnozoological publications grew out of studies undertaken in academic areas such as zoology, human ecology, sociology and anthropology - reflecting the interdisciplinary character of ethnozoology. This review presents an historical view of ethnozoological research in Brazil and examines its evolution, tendencies, and future perspectives.

Procedures

In examining the development and tendencies of Ethnozoology in Brazil, we analyzed papers published on this theme through March/2011. Only texts that had been published in scientific periodicals, books, or book chapters that considered human/faunal relationships were considered. Searches were made for articles available through international online databases such as Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar as well as specific journal web sites. We used the following search key words: Ethnozoology, Ethnoentomology, Ethnoichthyology, Historical ethnozoology, Cynegetic activities, Ethnocarcinology, Ethnoornithology, Ethnotaxonomy, Ethnomastozoology, Ethnoherpetology, Ethnomalacology, Animal use and Zootherapy. It is important to note that a number of papers could be classified into more than one category, but for purposes of this revision we considered only the principal theme of the work in deciding its category (e.g. a publication focused on the medicinal uses of reptiles was considered under the heading of zootherapy, and not ethnoherpetology. We recorded the location where the works were published, which allowed to identify their distribution according to biomes and regions where the studies were performed.

The first works

The first paper published in Brazil with a strict ethnozoological focus appeared in 1939 and described the popular zoological vocabulary used by Brazilian natives [16]. It must be noted, however, that when the first naturalists, colonists, and Jesuits arrived in the country in the 16th century they encountered an abundant, diversified and strange fauna waiting to be documented. According to Ribeiro [17], the discovery of a whole new world in the Americas generated tremendous curiosity among Europeans about the new and different plants and animals that thrived in those lands. In the centuries that followed these first contacts, explorers, chroniclers and naturalists from many disciplines and many parts of Europe set out to describe this exotic cultural universe and the fantastic and unique natural world.

These historical documents provided descriptions of the local fauna and described the hunting techniques employed by local natives in embryonic ethnozoological approaches. According to Papavero [18], the indigenous tribes, notably those who spoke the Tupi language, acted as the first professors of natural history in Brazil, transmitting their detailed knowledge of the fauna and flora to the Jesuits, who were, in this area at least, their students. Based on the information provided by these native tribes, the members of this religious order recorded the first lists and vocabularies of the local fauna. Among these missionaries were José de Anchieta, Gaspar Affonso, Francisco Soares and, especially, Leonardo de Valle who listed nothing less than 351 Tupi names for different animals (in about 1585) - a valuable linguistic and ethnozoological document that was only recently published. Little by little, expeditions through South America revealed an extremely rich fauna composed of animals of rare beauty, such as parrots and macaws (which led to Brazil being called for a certain time the "Land of Parrots"), as well as strange creatures that were very different from any previously known to Europeans. These findings stimulated the naturalists of that time to formulate various theories about the geographical distribution of species in the world [18].

Given that naturalists have been recording ethnozoological knowledge since colonial times, one could consider the roots of ethnozoological in Brazil as dating from the 16th century - so that the history of ethnozoology in Brazil blends into the history of zoology itself. In truth, it can be said that ethnozoology is old in practice but young in theory, for the discipline is not as modern as it might first appear, with roots going back to the earliest relationships between animals and humans. A number of initiatives began to appear to recuperate zoological data from colonial period documents - an academic area that can be called Historical Ethnozoology. Nelson Papavero (at the University of São Paolo), Dante Luiz Martins Teixeira (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro), and Hitoshi Nomura (University of São Paolo) have published a series of papers on this theme in Brazil [eg. [1925]]

Ethnozoological research in Brazil

If on one hand it can be said that ethnozoological documentation dates to the 16th century, scientific production in this area only began to gain form in Brazil near the beginning of the 21st century (Figure 1). In analyzing the distribution of publications (scientific periodicals, books and book chapters) over the years we noted that a large majority of the research on this theme (350 (73.3%) of 487 works) were published within just the last ten years (coinciding with an increase in published works in the many areas of ethnosciences in that country). A review undertaken by Oliveira et al.[26] in the field of ethnobotany, for example, revealed that the numbers of publications in scientific journals had experienced an expressive expansion in the last decade.
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1746-4269-7-22/MediaObjects/13002_2011_Article_232_Fig1_HTML.jpg
Figure 1

Temporal distribution of Ethnozoological research in Brazil. Crude data (dotted line) and data adjusted to an exponential growth curve.

The notable concentration of ethnozoological publications in recent years in Brazil is consistent with the historical development of this discipline. The academic development of ethnobiology in this country is only very recent, and greater numbers of publications in recent years would therefore be expected. A total of 487 works were published up until July 2011 (Figure 1). Starting with the first ethnozoolology publication in 1939, the following years were characterized by small productions (a maximum of six publications/year). In the 1990's publications begin to appear in greater numbers, but only in the 21st century did journal production really reach expressive numbers. Likewise the diversity of themes examined in ethnozoological research became more numerous and diversified during the Brazilian Ethnobiology and Ethnoecology Symposiums, the National Zoology Congresses, and the Brazilian Ecology Congresses held in recent years; it is hoped that this growth will soon be reflected in increased numbers of publications.

Figure 2 lists the themes of ethnozoological publications discussed in the present revision. The subjects considered in these publications can be divided into 13 categories, with the specific themes most frequently treated being: zootherapy - the use of animals and their sub-products in folk medicine (17.86% of the titles), ethnoentomology (12.94%), ethnoichthyology (12.32%), historical ethnozoology (8.83%), cynegetic activities (hunting activities) (5.75%), ethnocarcinology (4.72% each), ethnoornithology (4.11%), ethnotaxonomy (3.08%), education and management (3.7%), the use of animals for magic-religious purposes and cultural symbolisms (3.08%), ethnomastozoology (2.87%), ethnoherpetology (2.46%), and ethnomalacology (2.26%). Any work that did not fit well into the above mentioned categories was classified as "others" (1.02%).
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1746-4269-7-22/MediaObjects/13002_2011_Article_232_Fig2_HTML.jpg
Figure 2

Distribution of Ethnozoology research in the Brazil according to the study theme. A - Zootherapy, B - Others, C - Ethnoentomology, D - Ethnoichthyology, E - Historical ethnozoology, F - Cynegetic activities, G - Ethnocarcinology, H - Ethnoornithology, I - Education and management, J - Ethnotaxonomy, L - Magic-religious purposes and cultural symbolisms, M - Ethnomastozoology, N - Ethnomalacology, O - Ethnoherpetology.

One of the principal reasons that Ethnozoology is still only poorly studied in Brazil is related to legal problems associated with the use of wild animals. Hunting is completely prohibited in the country, and this is known to anyone who sells or uses animal products (making full cooperation with researchers much more difficult). The legal implications of the protection of the local fauna will in turn influence the choice of topics for ethnozoolology studies. The result is that themes such as ethnoichthyology and ethnoentomology represent a significant percentage of the publications - a situation associated with the importance of these faunal groups, but also with the fact that these animals (fish and insects) can generally be used or sold without excessive legal restrictions and this is one reason why there are more studies on this subject. In the case of ethnoichthyology, it is noted that even fishers' behavior and fisheries management have been the object of many studies. The human populations that harvest these resources generally feel more secure about sharing information about their activities. On the other hand, researchers who might wish to study the hunting of wild animals - a very common practice in Brazil in spite of its notorious illegality - will have to overcome considerably more suspicion and reluctance on the part of their informants.

The focus of ethnozoology publications varies according to the region in which they are developed, as would be expected. The realities of each region, including its cultural diversity and the diverse types of ecosystems that occur there, will strongly influence research directions. Studies dealing with fishing resources (fish, crustaceans and mollusks) are more frequently undertaken in coastal areas, for example, while most of the published papers from the Amazon region have dealt with cynegetic animals and the use of the local fauna by indigenous groups. The environments in which the largest numbers of research projects were undertaken were: coastal and estuary sites (22.38%, n = 109 studies), Caatinga (dryland) areas (18.69%, n = 91), the Amazon region (16.02%, n = 78), and the Atlantic Forest (5.75%, n = 28). Only eleven studies were produced in the Cerrado (savanna) biome (2.26%), and no studies were published focusing on the Pantanal seasonal wetlands. A few projects (n = 10, 2.05%) were undertaken in two or more biomes; many were general studies (32.85%, n = 160) and not restricted to specific biomes (Table 1, Figure 3).
Table 1

Ethnozoological studies published in Brazil by theme, region and biome.

STUDY THEMES

BIOMES

REGIONS*

 
 

Amazon region

Caatinga (dryland) areas

Cerrado (savanna)

Atlantic Forest

Coastal and estuary sites

Two or more biomes

Unspecified

N

NE

N-NE

S

SE

CO

UN

Cynegetic activities

[2941]

[6, 4249]

 

[5052]

[53]

[54]

[55]

[2932, 3437, 3941]

[6, 4249, 52]

  

[50, 51, 53]

[38]

[33, 54, 55]

Education and management

[5658]

[59]

 

[6062]

[6369]

 

[7073]

[5658]

[5961, 6567]

  

[62, 64, 6870]

 

[63, 7173]

Ethnocarcinology

[74]

[7577]

  

[7895]

 

[96]

[74]

[7581, 8388, 91, 92, 94]

  

[89, 90, 93, 95]

 

[82, 96]

Ethnoentomology

[97106]

[107130]

[131, 132]

[133136]

  

[137159]

[97, 98, 100106]

[107130, 134, 136, 141, 142, 146, 158]

 

[133, 159]

[135, 152]

[99, 131, 132]

[137140, 143145, 147151, 153157]

Ethnoherpetology

[160, 161]

[162166]

    

[167171]

[160, 161]

[162166]

    

[167171]

Ethnoichthyology

[172179]

[180183]

[184]

[185188]

[189222]

[223]

[224231]

[172, 173, 175, 177179]

[176, 180183, 185, 194198, 202, 203, 205, 210, 218, 219]

[211, 212, 221]

[199, 229]

[186191, 193, 200, 201, 204, 206209, 213215, 220, 225]

[174, 184]

[192, 216, 217, 222224, 226228, 230, 231]

Ethnomalacology

[232]

 

[233]

[234]

[235240]

[241]

[242]

[232]

[234241]

   

[233]

[242]

Ethnomastozoology

[243]

[244, 245]

[246]

[247]

[248250]

 

[251256]

[243]

[244, 245, 247]

 

[248, 254, 255]

[250, 252]

[246]

[249, 251, 253, 256]

Ethnoornithology

[257]

[258262]

[263, 264]

[265, 266]

[267]

[268]

[269276]

[257]

[258262, 265268, 271, 272, 276]

  

[263, 264, 274]

 

[269, 270, 273, 275]

Ethnotaxonomy

[277, 278]

[279, 280]

  

[281289]

[290]

[291]

[277, 278]

[279, 280, 282287, 289, 291]

  

[281, 288]

 

[290]

Historical ethnozoology

[21, 24, 292306]

  

[307]

  

[18, 20, 22, 23, 308328]

[21, 24, 292306]

[22]

  

[307, 315, 316, 318, 320]

[319]

[18, 20, 23, 308314, 317, 321328]

Magic-religious purposes and cultural symbolisms

[329331]

[332335]

    

[336343]

[330, 331]

[332335, 341]

[329]

   

[336340, 342, 343]

Zootherapy

[344350]

[351378]

[379]

[380382]

[383388]

[389392]

[393431]

[344346, 349, 350]

[348, 351378, 380383, 388, 389, 403405, 409, 411, 422, 430]

[384386, 390, 391]

 

[387]

[379]

[347, 392402, 406408, 410, 412421, 423, 424, 426429, 431]

Others

[432440]

[441444]

[445447]

[448453]

[454477]

[478, 479]

[14, 16, 431, 480506]

[432440, 467, 479, 483, 506]

[442, 443, 452457, 460466, 468, 471, 473476, 486, 491, 492, 505]

[441, 494]

[477, 480, 481]

[447451, 458, 459, 469, 470, 472, 478, 484]

[445, 446]

[14, 16, 444, 482, 485, 487490, 493, 495504]

N - Northern region, NE - Northeastern region, N-NE - Northern and Northeastern regions, S - South region, SE - Southern region, CO - Central-western region, UN - Unspecified

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1746-4269-7-22/MediaObjects/13002_2011_Article_232_Fig3_HTML.jpg
Figure 3

Distribution of Ethnozoological research in Brazil by biome.

In spite of the quantitative increase of published reports in Brazil, there are still regional imbalances in terms of ethnozoological research and associated scientific production - with research being concentrated in the northeastern region of that country (39%, n = 190) (especially in the states of Bahia and Paraíba). Many of these studies were undertaken in the northern (15.2%, n = 74) and southeastern (11.9%, n = 58) regions of Brazil. In contrast, relatively few ethnozoological studies have been produced focusing on areas in the central-western and southern regions of the country (twelve (2.4%) and ten (2.0%) studies respectively). Eleven studies have been published concerning work undertaken in cities in northern and northeastern Brazil, while 27.1% (n = 132) did not foci on any specific region Figure 4).
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1746-4269-7-22/MediaObjects/13002_2011_Article_232_Fig4_HTML.jpg
Figure 4

Distribution of Ethnozoological research in Brazil by region. UNS = Unspecified.*Legend: N - Northern region, NE - Northeastern region, N-NE - Northern and Northeastern regions, S - South region, SE - Southern region, CO - Central-western region, UNS = Unspecified.

The recent quantitative advances in ethnozoological publications were in large part due to the work of new researchers employed in research and teaching positions throughout Brazil who (together with the pioneer researchers) have greatly contributed to the growth of this area. Some of the articles published (n = 31, 6.3%) include the participation of foreign researchers, showing the existence of international links and interactions between researchers from Brazil and others countries. It must be pointed out, however, that the numbers of researchers directly involved with ethnozoological inquires in Brazil are still very small, although many zoologists and ecologists have undertaken research programs in this area even though ethnozoology is not their principal line of research. Another important aspect related to recent advances in ethnozoology is the fact that this subject is now offered in many graduate courses, even in largely specific departments such as Zoology and Ecology (e.g. the State University of Paraiba, and the State University of Feira de Santana). As such, there have been significant increases in the availability of advisors as well as in the numbers of graduate courses on this theme- which have contributed to the recent advances in ethnozoological studies in Brazil and reinforced the growth of this field.

Ethnozoological research papers have appeared in many different national (66.9%, n = 326) and international (33.%, n = 161) publications. Among the texts identified, most have appeared in scientific periodicals. Although these journal articles are the most frequent type of ethnozoological publication, there are currently no specialized ethnozoological journals published in Brazil (and even on a global scale there are relatively few journals focused on ethnobiology). As such, ethnozoological articles have been published in journals covering many different areas, such as traditional medicine, conservation, ethnography, conservation and management, among others. Although the multidisciplinary nature of ethnozoology permits different types of articles to be published in different journals (which has been an important factor stimulating the growth of scientific production on these themes), the results of our present study reinforce the necessity of establishing more journals with specific ethnobiological focuses that can accept texts in both ethnozoology and ethnobotany.

Brazil stands out as one of the world's leading producers of ethnozoological studies. These quantitative advances indicate that the country will continue to have an important role in ethnozoological research, and this same tendency has been observed for ethnobotany [26] - which places this country in the global vanguard of ethnobiological inquires. In spite of this optimistic outlook, however, it is important to note that human resources with specializations in ethnozoology are still relatively scarce, and research centers in this area are restricted to just a few states in the country. On the other hand, interactions between ethnozoologists, zoologists and ecologists have been increasing and will certainly generate more publications and improvements in research quality.

In spite of the quantitative growth of ethnozoological research, there is a clear need for qualitative improvements in the publications generated. Many of the journal articles have had strongly descriptive natures, based simply on lists of species (which are often taxonomically incorrect or are restricted to just the common names of the animals). There is a necessity for planning and preparing studies with greater scientific rigor; for studies addressing specific questions and hypotheses; as well as theoretical and methodological advances that will help consolidate ethnozoology. In their review of ethnobotany in Brazil, Oliveira et al. [26] noted the tendency to incorporate hypotheses as well as discussions and critical analyses of methodologies, as well as a movement towards focusing on the resolution of practical questions - tendencies that should likewise guide ethnozoological and ethnobiological researchers. The document "Intellectual Imperatives in Ethnobiology" [27], an international guideline to do ethnobiological research, makes it very clear that research projects in ethnobiology should be guided by hypotheses, that appropriate collaborators must be included to assure the use of rigorous methodologies inspired by different but related disciplines, and that statistical analyses and rigorous and appropriate mathematical models must be used to guide data collection and analysis [27].

As was noted by Oliveira [26], a number of important events have contributed to the development of the ethnosciences (including ethnozoology) in Brazil, including: the publication of the first edition of "Suma Etnológica Brasileira" [28]; the success of the I International Congress of Ethnobiology in 1988 in Belém, Pará State (during which the International Ethnobiology Society [ISE] was founded); the foundation of the Brazilian Society of Ethnobiology and Ethnoecology (SBEE) during the I Brazilian Symposium of Ethnobiology and Ethnoecology held in 1996; as well as numerous other national, regional and state-level symposia of ethnobiology and ethnoecology that have taken place in recent years. More recently (in February/2010), the I Brazilian Symposium of Ethnozoology was held during the XXVIII Brazilian Congress of Zoology in Belém, Pará State; and in November/2010 the VIII Brazilian Symposium of Ethnobiology and Ethnoecology and the II Latin-American Congress of Ethnobiology took place in Recife, Pernambuco State. As was noted by Oliveira et al. [26], the SBEE has assumed an important role in the promotion of different forums for debate in which professionals from the area have been able to discuss the perspectives, limitations, conceptual and theoretical questions, theories, and methodologies, as well as the political and social implications of research in this area. The incorporation of ethnozoology into graduate programs has likewise made important contributions to this process. The challenges that the ethnosciences must face in the coming years include the amplification of graduate programs in regions and biomes that have been as yet little studied, as well as the continued thematic diversification of the field - which will help Brazilian ethnozoology consolidate itself as a modern and multidisciplinary science aligned with international research standards.

Ethnozoology currently confronts a number of challenges, and some of the most urgent items include the establishment of efficient dialogs between different academic areas that interface with ethnozoology; qualitative improvements in research techniques; greater scientific rigor; consolidation of undergraduate and graduate courses; exchanges of experiences in relation to the results produced and the methodologies utilized; and the development of monitoring programs based on sound research into the conservation and sustainable use of natural resources.

One of the main characteristics of human knowledge is its dynamism [26]. Reformulations of objectives, methodologies and theories occur in all of the sciences from time to time - and ethnozoology will not be different in this respect. The fact that ethnozoology has been the target of many recent criticisms has helped transform it into an area of scientific study bursting with new ideas and different reflections. As was noted by Oliveira [26], at a time when the world is debating so many polemic themes concerning the benefits and dangers of scientific/technological advances, the ethnosciences are discussing the possibility of linking scientific research to human priorities (especially to aid traditional populations and societies that have been historically excluded), the urgent necessities of conservation, and the more parsimonious use of natural resources.

In summary, literature researches indicated that ethnozoology has experienced significant advances in recent years in Brazil - although this discipline is still in the process of developing a sound theoretical base and unified methodological programs. A wide range of methodologies and theories have arisen in different areas of learning that can be put to good use if the right questions are asked using ethnozoological approaches.

The dynamism of this discipline in Brazil can be confirmed in the quantitative and qualitative growth of research papers published in scientific journals and discussed at related national events. More proof of the approaching maturity of this discipline can be seen in the numbers of internationally respected Brazilian ethnozoologists who are directly involved in the progress seen in their fields, and the participation of a many Brazilian researchers on editorial commissions and as consultants in renowned periodicals. From a qualitative point of view, however, improvement is still needed in terms of methodological procedures, taxonomic precision, and the use of quantitative techniques. The challenges to studying ethnozoology in Brazil are not small, and the tendencies described in the present study may aid in defining research strategies that will maintain the quantitative growth observed in the recent years but likewise foster needed qualitative improvements.

Declarations

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge to CNPq/Edital Universal program (472623/2009-5) and to UEPB/PROPESQ-011/2008 for financial support. We thank to CAPES (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior) for providing a Ph.D. scholarship to W.M.S Souto and to CNPq (Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico) for providing a research fellowship to R. R. N. Alves. This manuscript is an updated version of the book chapter 'Alves, R. R. N.; Souto MSW. Panorama atual, avanços e perspectivas futuras para Etnozoologia no Brasil. In: Alves, R.R.N.; Souto, W. M. S.; Mourão, J.S.. (Org.). A Etnozoologia no Brasil: importância, status atual e perspectivas. 1 ed. Recife: NUPEEA, 2010, v. 1, p. 41-55'.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba
(2)
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas (Zoologia), Departamento de Sistemática e Ecologia, Universidade Federal da Paraíba

References

  1. Pataca EM: A Ilha do Marajó na Viagem Philosophica (1783-1792) de Alexandre Rodrigues Ferreira. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Göeldi, sér Ciências Humanas. 2005, 1: 149-169.Google Scholar
  2. Rist J, Milner-Gulland E, Cowlishaw G, Rowcliffe M: Hunter Reporting of Catch per Unit Effort as a Monitoring Tool in a Bushmeat-Harvesting System Información sobre la Captura por Unidad de Esfuerzo Proporcionada por Cazadores como una Herramienta de Monitoreo en un Sistema de Cosecha de Carne Silvestre. Conservation Biology. 2010, 24: 489-499. 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2010.01470.x.Google Scholar
  3. Foster MS, James SR: Dogs, Deer, or Guanacos: Zoomorphic Figurines from Pueblo Grande, Central Arizona. Journal of Field Archaeology. 2002, 29: 165-176. 10.2307/3181491.Google Scholar
  4. Frazier J: Sustainable use of wildlife: The view from archaeozoology. Journal for Nature Conservation. 2007, 15: 163-173. 10.1016/j.jnc.2007.08.001.Google Scholar
  5. Alvard MS, Robinson JG, Redford KH, Kaplan H: The Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting in the Neotropics. Conservation Biology. 1997, 11: 977-982. 10.1046/j.1523-1739.1997.96047.x.Google Scholar
  6. Alves RRN, Mendonça LET, Confessor MVA, Vieira WLS, Lopez LCS: Hunting strategies used in the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2009, 5: 1-50. 10.1186/1746-4269-5-1.PubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  7. Ikeya K: Hunting with Dogs among the San in the Central Kalahari. African Study Monographs. 1994, 15: 119-134.Google Scholar
  8. Larsen CS: Animal source foods and human health during evolution. The Journal of nutrition. 2003, 133: 3893-3897.Google Scholar
  9. Holzman D: Meat eating is an old human habit. New Scientist. 2003, 179:Google Scholar
  10. Wing ES: Animals used for food in the past: As seen by their remains excavated from archeological sites. The Cambridge world history of food. Edited by: Kiple KF, Ornelas KC. 2000, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1: 51-58.Google Scholar
  11. Serpell J: In the company of animals: A study of human-animal relationships. 1996, Cambridge: Cambridge University PressGoogle Scholar
  12. Marques JGW: Pescando pescadores: etnoecologia abrangente no baixo São Francisco alagoano. 1995, São Paulo, BR: NUPAUB-USPGoogle Scholar
  13. Sax B: The Mythological Zoo: An Encyclopedia of Animals in World Myth, Legend and Literature. 2002, Santa Barbara,: ABC-CLIO, IncGoogle Scholar
  14. Alves RRN, Souto WMS: Etnozoologia: conceitos, considerações históricas e importância. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 19-40. 1Google Scholar
  15. Sillitoe P: Ethnobiology and applied anthropology: rapprochement of the academic with the practical. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute. 2006, 12: S119-S142. 10.1111/j.1467-9655.2006.00276.x.Google Scholar
  16. Von Ihering R: Ensaio geográfico sôbre o vocabulário zoológico popular do Brasil. Revista Brasileira de Geografia. 1939, 3: 73-88.Google Scholar
  17. Ribeiro R: A triste e malsucedida epopéia transatlântica da onça que "morreo de raiveza, ferrando os dentes em hum pao" O tráfico de animais no Brasil Colônia. Book A triste e malsucedida epopéia transatlântica da onça que "morreo de raiveza, ferrando os dentes em hum pao" O tráfico de animais no Brasil Colônia. 2006Google Scholar
  18. Papavero N: Os 500 anos da Zoologia no Brasil. Ciência Hoje. 2000, 28: 30-35.Google Scholar
  19. Nomura H: História da Zoologia no Brasil - século XVI. 1996, Mossoró, RN: FundaçãoVingt-un Rosado e ETFRN-UNED, 1Google Scholar
  20. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: Braz da Costa Rubim e seu mini-dicionário de nomes indígenas dos animais do Brasil (1882). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 2000, 32: 1-2.Google Scholar
  21. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 2. A viagem de Orellana rio Amazonas abaixo nos anos de 1541 e 1542 e a crônica de Frei Gaspar de Carvajal. Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 8: 1-6.Google Scholar
  22. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: A fauna do Maranhão segundo a "Poranduba Maranhense" de Frei Francisco de N. S. dos Prazeres Maranhão" (1820). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 2000, 40: 1-14.Google Scholar
  23. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: Informações zoológicas contidas nas Cartas de Luiz dos Santos Vilhena (Fins do século XVIII). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 2000, 25: 1-10.Google Scholar
  24. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Overal WL, Luz JRP: O Novo Éden. A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas desde a descoberta do rio Amazonas por Pinzón (1500) até o Tratado de Santo Ildsefonso (1777). 2002, Belém, PA, Brazil: Museu Paraense Emílio Gopeldi & MCT, 2Google Scholar
  25. Nomura H: História da Zoologia no Brasil - século XVIII. 1998, Lisboa, Portugal: Museu Bocage - Museu Nacional de História Natural, 1Google Scholar
  26. Oliveira FC, Albuquerque UP, Fonseca-Kruel VS, Hanazaki N: Avanços nas pesquisas etnobotânicas no Brasil. Acta Botanica Brasilica. 2009, 23:Google Scholar
  27. Salick J, Alcorn J, Anderson E, Asa C, Balee W, Balick M, Beckerman S, Bennett B, Caballero J, Camilo G: Intellectual Imperatives in Ethnobiology: NSF Biocomplexity Workshop Report. St Louis: Missouri Botanical Gardens. 2003, [http://www.econbotorg/pdf/NSF_brochurepdf]Google Scholar
  28. Ribeiro BG, Ribeiro D: Suma etnológica brasileira. 1986, VozesGoogle Scholar
  29. Medeiros MFST, Garcia LG: O consumo e as estratégias de caça utilizadas pelas populações tradicionais da Reserva Extrativista Chico Mendes. Interações. 2006, 3: 121-134.Google Scholar
  30. Fuccio H, Carvalho EF, Vargas G: Perfil da caça e dos caçadores no estado do Acre, Brasil. Revista Aportes Andinos. 2003, 6: 1-18.Google Scholar
  31. Pezzuti JCB, Silva DF, Rebelo GH, Lima JP: A captura de quelônios no Parque Nacional do Jaú, Amazonas. Coletânea de Textos: manejo e monitoramento de fauna silvestre em florestas tropicais. Edited by: Silva FPC, Gomes-Silva DA, Melo JS, Nascimento VM. 2008, Belém;, 150-156.Google Scholar
  32. Ramos RM, Carmo NS, Pezzuti JCB: Caça e uso da fauna. Atlas socioambiental: municípios de Tomé-Açu, Aurora do Pará, Ipixuna do Pará, Paragominas e Ulianópolis. Edited by: Monteiro MA. 2008, Belém: NAEA, 224-232.Google Scholar
  33. Ayres JM, Ayres C: Aspectos da caça no alto rio Aripuanã. Acta Amazônica. 1979, 9: 287-298.Google Scholar
  34. Smith NJH: Utilization of game along Brazil's transamazon highway. Acta Amazonica. 1976, 6: 455-466.Google Scholar
  35. Smith NJH: Human exploitation of terra firme fauna in Amazonia. Ciência e Cultura. 1978, 30: 17-23.Google Scholar
  36. Smith NJH: Caimans, Capybaras, otters, manatees, and man in amazonia. Biological Conservation. 1981, 19: 177-187. 10.1016/0006-3207(81)90033-1.Google Scholar
  37. Ayres JM, Lima D, Martins ES, Barreiros JL: On the track of the road: changes in subsistence hunting in a Brazilian Amazonian Village. Neotropical wildlife use and conservation. Edited by: Robinson JG, Redford KH. 1991, Chicago, USA: University Press, 82-92.Google Scholar
  38. Trinca CT, Ferrari SF: Caça em assentamento rural na Amazônia matogrossense. Diálogos em ambiente e sociedade no Brasil. Edited by: Jacobi P, Ferreira LC. 2006, Indaiatuba, SP: ANPPAS, 155-167. 1Google Scholar
  39. Baia Júnior P, Guimarães DAA, Le Pendu Y: Non-legalized commerce in game meat in the Brazilian amazon: a case study. Revista de Biología Tropical. 2010, 58: 1079-1088.Google Scholar
  40. Fachín-Terán A, Vogt RC, Thorbjarnarson JB: Patterns of Use and Hunting of Turtles in the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve, Amazonas, Brazil. People in nature: wildlife conservation in South and Central America. Edited by: Silvius K, Bodmer RE, Fragoso JMV. 2004, New York, USA: Columbia University Press, 363-377. 1Google Scholar
  41. Carvalho EAR, Pezzuti JCB: Hunting of jaguars and pumas in the Tapajós-Arapiuns Extractive Reserve, Brazilian Amazonia. Oryx. 2010, 44: 610-612. 10.1017/S003060531000075X.Google Scholar
  42. Albuquerque HN, Albuquerque ICS, Menezes IR, Monteiro JA, Barbosa AR, Cavalcanti MLF: Utilização da Maniçoba (Manihot glaziowii Mull., Euphorbiaceae) na caça de aves em Sertânia-PE. Revista de Biologia e Ciências da Terra. 2004, 4 (2): 1-6.Google Scholar
  43. Ramos MM, Mourão JS, Abrantes SHF: Conhecimento tradicional dos caçadores de Pedra Lavrada (Paraíba, Brasil) sobre os recursos faunísticos caçados. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2009, 9: 215-224.Google Scholar
  44. Barbosa JAA, Nobrega VA, Alves RRN: Aspectos da caça e comércio ilegal da avifauna silvestre por populações tradicionais do semi-árido paraibano. Revista de Biologia e Ciências da Terra. 2010, 2: 39-49.Google Scholar
  45. Alves RRN, Mendonça LET, Confessor MVA, Vieira WLdS, Vieira KS, Alves FN: Caça no semi-árido paraibano: uma abordagem etnozoológica. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 347-378. 1Google Scholar
  46. Miranda CL, Alencar GS: Aspects of hunting activity in Serra da Capivara National Park, in the state of Piauí, Brazil. Natureza & Conservação. 2007, 5: 115-121.Google Scholar
  47. Dantas-Aguiar PR, Barreto RM, Santos-Fita D, Santos EB: Hunting Activities and Wild Fauna Use: a Profile of Queixo D'antas Community, Campo Formoso, Bahia, Brazil. Bioremediation, Biodiversity and Bioavailability. 2011Google Scholar
  48. Barboza RRD, Mourão JS, Souto WMS, Alves RRN: Knowledge and Strategies of Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus L. 1758 and Euphractus sexcinctus L. 1758) Hunters in the "Sertão Paraibano", Paraíba State, NE Brazil. Bioremediation, Biodiversity and Bioavailability. 2011, 5: 1-7.Google Scholar
  49. Barbosa JAA, Nobrega VA, Alves RRN: Hunting practices in the semiarid region of Brazil. Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge. 2011, 10: 486-490.Google Scholar
  50. Andriguetto-Filho JM, Krüger AC, Lange MB: Caça, biodiversidade e gestão ambiental na Área de Proteção Ambiental de Guaraqueçaba, Paraná, Brasil. Biotemas. 1998, 11: 133-156.Google Scholar
  51. Verdade LM, Campos CB: How much is a puma worth? Economic compensation as an alternative for the conflict between wildlife conservation and livestock production in Brazil. Biota Neotropica. 2004, 4: 1-4.Google Scholar
  52. Pereira JPR, Schiavetti A: Conhecimentos e usos da fauna cinegética pelos caçadores indígenas "Tupinambá de Olivença" (Bahia). Biota Neotropica. 2010, 10: 175-183. 10.1590/S1676-06032010000100018.Google Scholar
  53. Hanazaki N, Alves R, Begossi A: Hunting and use of terrestrial fauna used by Caicaras from the Atlantic Forest coast (Brazil). Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2009, 5: 1-36. 10.1186/1746-4269-5-1.Google Scholar
  54. Lustig-Arecco V: Recursos Naturais e Técnicas de Caça. Revista de Antropologia. 1979, 22: 39-60.Google Scholar
  55. Cymerys M, Shanley P, Luz L: Quando a caça conserva a mata. Ciência Hoje. 1997, 22: 22-24.Google Scholar
  56. Baía Júnior PC, Guimarães DAA: Parque Ambiental de Belém: um estudo da conservação da fauna silvestre local e a interação desta atividade com a comunidade do entorno. Revista Científica da UFPA. 2004, 4: 1-18.Google Scholar
  57. McGrath DG, Calabria J, Amaral B, Futemma CFC: Varzeiros, geleiros e o manejo dos recursos naturais na várzea do Baixo Amazonas. Cadernos do NAEA. 1993, 1: 91-125.Google Scholar
  58. McGrath DG, Castro F, Futemma CFC, Amaral BD, Calabria J: Fisheries and the evolution of resource management on the lower Amazon floodplain. Human Ecology. 1993, 21: 167-195. 10.1007/BF00889358.Google Scholar
  59. Costa-Neto EM, Gouw MS: Atitudes dos estudantes do Curso de Ciências Biológicas da Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana (Bahia) com relação à utilização de insetos em atividades didático-científicas. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2006, 6: 76-83.Google Scholar
  60. Lima KEC, Mayer M, Carneiro-Leão AM, Vasconcelos SD: Conflito ou convergência? percepções de professores e licenciandos sobre ética no uso de animais no ensino de zoologia. Investigações em Ensino de Ciências. 2008, 13: 353-369.Google Scholar
  61. Razera JCC, Boccardo L, Paula J, Pereira R: Percepções sobre a fauna em estudantes indígenas de uma tribo tupinambá no Brasil: um caso de etnozoologia. Revista Electrónica de Enseñanza de las Ciencias. 2006, 5: 466-480.Google Scholar
  62. Pires MRS, Pinto LCL, Mateus MB: Etnozoologia como instrumento para a conservação da fauna da Serra do Ouro Branco, Minas Gerais. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 471-494. 1Google Scholar
  63. Begossi A: Temporal stability in fishing spots: conservation and co-management in Brazilian artisanal coastal fisheries. Ecology and Society. 2006, 11: 5-Google Scholar
  64. Barbosa SRCS, Begossi A: Fisheries, gender, and local changes at Itaipu Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: an individual approach. Revista Multiciência. 2: 1-14.
  65. Burda CL, Schiavetti A: Análise ecológica da pesca artesanal em quatro comunidades pesqueiras da Costa de Itacaré, Bahia, Brasil: Subsídios para a Gestão Territorial. Revista da Gestão Costeira Integrada. 2008, 8: 149-168.Google Scholar
  66. Costa-Neto EM: Sustainable development and traditional knowledge: a case study in a Brazilian artisanal fishermen's community. Sustainable Development. 2000, 8: 89-95. 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1719(200005)8:2<89::AID-SD130>3.0.CO;2-S.Google Scholar
  67. Costa-Neto EM: Cultura pesqueira, desenvolvimento e sustentabilidade no litoral norte do estado da Bahia: um estudo de caso. TecBahia. 1999, 14: 131-139.Google Scholar
  68. Jankowsky M, Pires JSR, Nordi N: Contribuição ao manejo participativo do Caranguejo-uçá, Ucides cordatus (L., 1763). Cananéia, SP Boletim do Instituto de Pesca. 2006, 32: 221-228.Google Scholar
  69. Lopes PFM, Begossi A: Temporal changes in caiçara artisanal fishing and alternatives for management: a case study on the southeastern Brazilian coast. Biota Neotropica. 2008, 8: 53-62.Google Scholar
  70. Bruno M, Kraemer BM: Percepções de estudantes da 6a série (7° ano) do "Ensino Fundamental" em uma escola pública de Belo Horizonte, MG sobre os morcegos: uma abordagem etnozoológica. Revista Científica do Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Ambientais e da Saúde. 2010, 2: 42-50.Google Scholar
  71. Ferreira AM, Soares CAAA: Aracnídeos peçonhentos: análise das informações nos livros didáticos de ciências. Ciência & Educação. 2008, 14: 307-314.Google Scholar
  72. Pezzuti JCB: Manejo de caça e a conservação da fauna silvestre com participação comunitária. Papers do NAEA (UFPA). 2009, 1:Google Scholar
  73. Romão JA, Boccardo L, Souza M: Abordagem dos miriápodos em livros didáticos de ciências. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2008, 8: 89-98.Google Scholar
  74. Machado D: Catadoras de caranguejo e saberes tradicionais na conservação de manguezais da Amazônia brasileira. Estudos Feministas. 2007, 15: 485-490. 10.1590/S0104-026X2007000200016.Google Scholar
  75. Costa-Neto EM: O caranguejo-de-água-doce, Trichodactylus fluviatilis (Latreille, 1828) (Crustacea, Decapoda, Trichodactylidae), na concepção dos moradores do povoado de Pedra Branca, Bahia, Brasil. Biotemas. 2007, 20: 59-68.Google Scholar
  76. Montenegro SCS, Marques JGW, Nordi N: Pescadores de Camarão no Baixo São Francisco: Abordagem Etnoecológica com Ênfase nas Estratégias de Pesca. Conhecimento Tradicional e Estratégias de Sobrevivência de Populações Brasileiras. Edited by: Oliveira FB. 2007, Macéio, AL, Brazil: EDUFAL, 1-157.Google Scholar
  77. Montenegro SCS, Nordi N, Marques JGW: Contexto cultural, ecológico e econômico da produção e ocupação dos espaços de pesca pelos pescadores de pitu (Macrobrachium carcinus) em um trecho do Baixo São Francisco, Alagoas-Brasil. Interciencia. 2001, 26: 535-540.Google Scholar
  78. Magalhães HF, Costa Neto EM, Schiavetti A: Saberes pesqueiros tradicionais relacionados à coleta de crustáceos (Decapoda: Brachyura) no município de Conde, estado da Bahia. Biota Neopropica. 2011, 11: 1-10.Google Scholar
  79. Alves RRN, Nishida AK: A ecdise do caranguejo-uçá, Ucides cordatus L. (DECAPODA, BRACHYURA) na visão dos caranguejeiros. Interciencia. 2002, 27: 110-117.Google Scholar
  80. Costa-Neto EM, Lima KLG: Contribuição ao estudo da interação entre pescadores e caranguejos (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura): considerações etnobiológicas em uma comunidade pesqueira do estado da Bahia, Brasil. Actualidades Biologicas. 2000, 22: 195-202.Google Scholar
  81. Fiscarelli AG, Pinheiro MAA: Perfil sócio-econômico e conhecimento etnobiológico do catador do caranguejo-uçá, Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus, 1763) nos manguezais de Iguape (24 41S), SP, Brasil. Actualidades Biologicas. 2002, 24: 129-142.Google Scholar
  82. Nordi N: A captura do caranguejo-uçá (Ucides cordatus) durante o evento reprodutivo da espécie: o ponto de vista dos caranguejeiros. Revista Nordestina de Biologia. 1994, 9: 41-47.Google Scholar
  83. Nordi N: A produção dos catadores do caranguejo-uçá (Ucides cordatus) da região de Várzea Nova, Paraíba. Revista Nordestina de Biologia. 1994, 9: 71-77.Google Scholar
  84. Nordi N: O processo de comercialização do caranguejo-uçá (Ucides cordatus) e seus reflexos nas atividades de coleta. Revista Nordestina de Biologia. 1995, 10: 39-45.Google Scholar
  85. Nordi N: Time allocation and energy expenditure related to crab gathering activity. Ciência e Cultura. 1997, 49: 136-139.Google Scholar
  86. Nordi N, Nishida AK, Alves RRN: Effectiveness of Two Gathering Techniques for Ucides cordatus in Northeast Brazil: Implications for the Sustainability of Mangrove Ecosystems. Human Ecology. 2009, 37: 121-127. 10.1007/s10745-009-9214-9.Google Scholar
  87. Souto FJB: Uma abordagem etnoecológica da pesca do caranguejo, Ucides cordatus, Linnaeus, 1763 (Decapoda: Brachyura), no manguezal do Distrito de Acupe (Santo Amaro-BA). Biotemas. 2007, 20: 69-80.Google Scholar
  88. Souto FJB, Marques JGW: "O siri labuta muito!" Uma abordagem etnoecológica abrangente da pesca de um conjunto de crustáceos no manguezal de Acupe, Santo Amaro, Bahia, Brasil. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2006, 6: 106-119.Google Scholar
  89. Passos CA, Di Beneditto APM: Captura comercial do caranguejo-uçá, Ucides cordatus (L., 1763), no Manguezal de Gargaú, RJ. Biotemas. 2005, 18: 223-231.Google Scholar
  90. Mendonça JT, Pereira ALC: Avaliação das capturas de caranguejo-uçá Ucides cordatus no município de Iguape, litoral sul de São Paulo, Brasil. Boletim do Instituto de Pesca. 2009, 35: 169-179.Google Scholar
  91. Carvalho HRL, Igarashi MA: A utilização do forjo na captura do caranguejo uçá (Ucides cordatus) na comunidade de Tapebas em Fortaleza - CE. Biotemas. 2009, 22: 69-74.Google Scholar
  92. Silva-Cavalcanti JS, Costa MF: Fisheries in Protected and Non-Protected Areas: Is it Different? The Case of Anomalocardia Brasiliana at Tropical Estuaries of Northeast Brazil. Journal of Coastal Research. 2009, 1454-1458.Google Scholar
  93. Severino-Rodrigues E, Pita JB, Graça-Lopes R: Pesca artesanal de siris (Crustacea, Decapoda, Portunidae) na região estuarina de Santos e São Vicente (SP), Brasil. Boletim do Instituto de Pesca, São Paulo. 2001, 27: 7-19.Google Scholar
  94. Souto FJB: Etnozoologia na pesca de camarões no manguezal de Acupe, Santo Amaro, Bahia. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 193-210. 1Google Scholar
  95. Oliveira LEC, Begossi A: Last Trip Return Rate Influence Patch Choice Decisions of Small-Scale Shrimp Trawlers: Optimal Foraging in São Francisco, Coastal Brazil. Human Ecology. 2011, 39: 323-332. 10.1007/s10745-011-9397-8.Google Scholar
  96. Nomura H: Os crustáceos na cultura popular. 2001, Mossoró, RN: Fundação Guimarães Duque e Fundação Vingt-un RosadoGoogle Scholar
  97. Camargo JMF, Posey DA: O conhecimento dos Kayapó sobre as abelhas sociais sem ferrão (Meliponidae, Apidae, Hymenoptera): notas adicionais. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi Nova série Zoologia. 1990, 6: 17-42.Google Scholar
  98. Coimbra CEA: Estudos de Ecologia Humana entre os Suruí do parque indígena Aripuanã, Rondônia: 1. O uso de larvas de Coleópteros (Bruchidae e Curculionidae) na alimentação. Revista Brasileira de Zoologia. 1983, 2: 35-47.Google Scholar
  99. Modro AFH, Costa MS, Maia E, Aburaya FH: Percepção entomológica por docentes e discentes do município de Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brasil. Biotemas. 2009, 22: 153-159.Google Scholar
  100. Posey DA: Kayapó controla inseto com uso adequado do ambiente. Revista Atualidade Indígena. 1979, 3: 47-56.Google Scholar
  101. Posey DA: Wasps, warriors, and fearless men: ethnoentomology of the Kayapó Indians of central Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology. 1981, 1: 165-174.Google Scholar
  102. Posey DA: A apicultura popular dos Kayapó. Revista Atualidade Indígena. 1981, 20: 36-41.Google Scholar
  103. Posey DA: The Importance of Bees to Kayapo Indians of the Brazilian Amazon. The Florida Entomologist. 1982, 65: 452-458. 10.2307/3494679.Google Scholar
  104. Posey DA: Ethnomethodology as an emic guide to cultural systems: the case of the insects and the Kayapó Indians of Amazonia. Revista Brasileira de Zoologia. 1983, 1: 135-144.Google Scholar
  105. Posey DA: Folk Apiculture of the Kayapo Indians of Brazil. Biotropica. 1983, 15: 154-158. 10.2307/2387963.Google Scholar
  106. Posey DA: Etnoentomologia de tribos indígenas da Amazônia. Suma Etnológica Brasileira Etnobiologia. Edited by: Ribeiro D. 1986, Petrópolis, RJ: Vozes/Finep, 251-272.Google Scholar
  107. Santos-Fita D, Costa-Neto EM, Schiavetti A: Constitution of ethnozoological semantic domains: meaning and inclusiveness of the lexeme" insect" for the inhabitants of the county of Pedra Branca, Bahia State, Brazil. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências. 2011, 83: 589-598.Google Scholar
  108. Costa-Neto EM: As cigarras (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) na visao dos moradores do povoado de Pedra Branca, Bahia, Brasil. Boletín de la SEA. 2008, 43: 453-457.Google Scholar
  109. Costa-Neto EM: Biotransformações de insetos no povoado de Pedra Branca, Estado da Bahia, Brasil. Interciencia. 2004, 29: 280-283.Google Scholar
  110. Costa-Neto EM: Bird-spiders (Arachnida, Mygalomorphae) as perceived by the inhabitants of the village of Pedra Branca, Bahia State, Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2006, 2: 7-10.1186/1746-4269-2-7.Google Scholar
  111. Costa-Neto EM: Centopéias (Arthropoda, Chilopoda) na concepção dos moradores do povoado de Pedra Branca, Bahia, Brasil. Boletín de la SEA. 2006, 39: 441-445.Google Scholar
  112. Costa-Neto EM: Cricket singing means rain: semiotic meaning of insects in the district of Pedra Branca, Bahia State, northeastern Brazil. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências. 2006, 78: 59-68.Google Scholar
  113. Costa-Neto EM: Fulgora laternaria Linnaeus, 1758 (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) na concepção dos moradores do povoado de Pedra Branca, Santa Terezinha, Bahia, Brasil. Revista de Ciências Ambientais. 2007, 1: 36-56.Google Scholar
  114. Costa-Neto EM: Insetos como recursos alimentares nativos no semi-árido do estado da Bahia, nordeste do Brasil. Zonas Áridas. 2004, 8: 33-40.Google Scholar
  115. Costa-Neto EM: La etnoentomología de las avispas (Hymenoptera, Vespoidea) en el poblado de Pedra Branca, estado de Bahia, nordeste de Brasil. Boletín de la SEA. 2004, 247-262.Google Scholar
  116. Costa-Neto EM: O conhecimento etnoentomológico do cavalo-do-cão (Hymenoptera, Pompilidae) no povoado de Pedra Branca, estado da Bahia, Brasil. Rev bra Zoociências. 2004, 6: 249-260.Google Scholar
  117. Costa-Neto EM: Os insetos que ofendem: artropodoses na visão dos moradores da região da Serra da Jibóia, Bahia, Brasil. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2004, 4: 81-90.Google Scholar
  118. Costa-Neto EM: "Piolho-de-cobra" (Arthropoda: Chilopoda: Geophilomorpha) na concepção dos moradores de Pedra Branca, Santa Terezinha, Estado da Bahia, Brasil. Acta Scientiarum Biological Sciences. 2008, 28: 143-148.Google Scholar
  119. Costa-Neto EM: The perception of Diplopoda (Arthropoda, Myriapoda) by the inhabitants of the county of Pedra Branca, Santa Teresinha, Bahia, Brasil. Acta Biologica Colombiana. 2007, 12: 125-136.Google Scholar
  120. Costa-Neto EM, Carvalho PD: Percepção dos insetos pelos graduandos da Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brasil. Acta Scientiarum Biological Sciences. 2000, 22: 423-428.Google Scholar
  121. Costa-Neto EM, Lago APA, Martins CC, Júnior PB: O "Louva-a-Deus-de-cobra", Phibalosoma sp. (Insecta, Phasmida), segundo a percepção dos moradores de Pedra Branca, Santa Terezinha, Bahia, Brasil. Sitientibus. 2005, 5 (1): 33-38.Google Scholar
  122. Costa-Neto EM, Pacheco JM: "Head of snake, wings of butterfly, and body of cicada": impressions of the lantern-fly (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) in the village of Pedra Branca, Bahia State, Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology. 2003, 23: 23-46.Google Scholar
  123. Costa-Neto EM, Pacheco JM: A construção do domínio etnozoológico "inseto" pelos moradores do povoado de Pedra Branca, Santa Terezinha, Estado da Bahia. Acta Scientiarum Biological Sciences. 2004, 26: 81-90.Google Scholar
  124. Costa-Neto EM, Resende JJ: A percepção de animais como "insetos" e sua utilização como recursos medicinais na cidade de Feira de Santana, Estado da Bahia, Brasil. Acta Scientiarum. 2004, 26: 143-149.Google Scholar
  125. Costa-Neto EM, Rodrigues RMFR: As formigas (Insecta: Hymenoptera) na concepção dos moradores de Pedra Branca, Santa Terezinha, estado da Bahia, Brasil. Boletín de la SEA. 2005, 353-364.Google Scholar
  126. Costa-Neto EM, Rodrigues RMFR: Os besouros (Insecta: Coleoptera) na concepção dos moradores de Pedra Branca, Santa Terezinha, Estado da Bahia. Acta Scientiarum Biological Sciences. 2006, 28 (1): 71-80.Google Scholar
  127. Costa-Neto EM, Sánchez-Salinas S: Actitudes de los estudiantes de licenciatura en lengua castellana de la Universidad Estatal de Feria de Santana, Bahia, Brasil, en relación con los insectos comestibles. Diálogos & Ciência. 2008, 16: 39-47.Google Scholar
  128. Dias MA, Costa-Neto EM: "Grilos" (Orthoptera) na percepção dos moradores de Feira de Santana, Bahia. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2005, 5: 99-114.Google Scholar
  129. Sampaio JA, Castro MS, Silva FO: Uso da cera de abelhas pelos índios Pankararé no Raso da Catarina, Bahia, Brasil. Arquivos do Museu Nacional. 2009, 67: 3-12.Google Scholar
  130. Costa-Neto EM, Andrade JN: Dimensão cognitiva, afetiva e comportamental da interação dos seres humanos com as lagartas (Insecta: Lepidoptera) no município de Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brasil. Sistemas biocognitivos tradicionales: Paradigmas en la conservación biológica y el fortalecimiento cultural. Edited by: Fuentes AM, Silva MTP, Méndez RM, Azúa RV, Correa PM, Santillán TVG. 2010, Pachuca, Mexico: Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Asociación Etnobiológica Mexicana y Sociedad Latinoamericana de Etnobiología, 3-8. 1Google Scholar
  131. Santos LO, Gurgel-Gonçalves R, Damasceno CP, Costa-Neto EM: Os piolhos-da-cabeça (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae) na visão de mães e filhos usuários de postos de assistência no Distrito Federal, Brasil. Boletín de la SEA. 2009, 45: 575-578.Google Scholar
  132. Modro AFH, Souza S, Aburaya FH, Maia E: Conhecimento dos moradores do médio Araguaia, Estado do Mato Grosso, sobre a utilidade de produtos de abelhas (Hymenoptera, Apidae). Acta Scientiarum Biological Sciences. 2009, 31: 421-424.Google Scholar
  133. Ulyssea MA, Hanazaki N, Lopes BC: Insetos no folclore da comunidade do Ribeirão da Ilha, Florianópolis. Sitientibus. 2010, 10: 244-251.Google Scholar
  134. Costa-Neto E, Magalhães HF: The ethnocategory ''insect'' in the conception of the inhabitants of Tapera County, São Gonçalo dos Campos, Bahia, Brazil. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências. 2007, 79: 239-249. 10.1590/S0001-37652007000200007.Google Scholar
  135. Rodrigues AS: Até quando o etnoconhecimento sobre as abelhas sem ferrão (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponinae) será transmitido entre gerações pelos índios Guarani M'byá da Aldeia Morro da Saudade, localizada na cidade de São Paulo, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil?. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2006, 6: 343-350.Google Scholar
  136. Boccardo L, Costa-Neto EM, Silva TRd, Jucá-Chagas R: Insetos na medicina popular do povoado de Porto Alegre, Maracás, Bahia. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 209-220. 1Google Scholar
  137. Carrera M: Nota sobre insetos utilizados como adorno. Revista Brasileira de Entomologia. 1982, 26: 133-135.Google Scholar
  138. Carrera M: Insetos, lendas e história. 1991, ThesaurusGoogle Scholar
  139. Carrera M: Entomofagia humana. Revista Brasileira de Entomologia. 1992, 36: 889-894.Google Scholar
  140. Coimbra CEA, Santos RV: Bicudo das palmáceas: praga ou alimento. Ciência Hoje, Rio de Janeiro. 1993, 16: 59-60.Google Scholar
  141. Costa-Neto EM: Considerations on the man/insect relationship in the state of Bahia, Brazil. Les "insectes" dans la tradition orale. Edited by: Motte-Florac É, Thomas JMC. 2003, Paris-Louvain: Peeters-SELAF, 95-104.Google Scholar
  142. Costa-Neto EM: Estudos etnoentomológicos no estado da Bahia, Brasil: uma homenagem aos 50 anos do campo de pesquisa. Biotemas. 2004, 17: 117-149.Google Scholar
  143. Costa-Neto EM: Insetos como fontes de alimentos para o homem: Valoração de recursos considerados repugnantes. Interciencia. 2003, 28: 136-140.Google Scholar
  144. Costa-Neto EM, Ramos-Elorduy J: Los Insectos Comestibles de Brasil: Etnicidad, Diversidad e Importancia en la Alimentación. Boletín Sociedad Entomológica Aragonesa. 2006, 423-442.Google Scholar
  145. Costa-Neto EM, Ramos-Elorduy J, Pino JM: Los insectos medicinales de Brasil: Primeros resultados. Boletín Sociedad Entomológica Aragonesa. 2006, 395-414.Google Scholar
  146. Costa-Neto EM: O significado dos Orthoptera (Arthropoda, Insecta) no Estado de Alagoas. Sitientibus. 1998, 18: 9-17.Google Scholar
  147. Costa Neto EM: A etnocategoria "inseto" e a hipótese da ambivalência entomoprojetiva. Acta Biológica Leopoldensia. 1999, 2: 7-14.Google Scholar
  148. Lenko K, Papavero N: Insetos no Folclore. 1996, São Paulo, Brazil: Plêiade/FAPESP, 2Google Scholar
  149. Lenko K, Papavero N: Os insetos no folclore. 1979, São Paulo, Brazil: Conselho Estadual de Artes e Ciências Humanas, 1Google Scholar
  150. Posey DA: Topics and issues in ethnoentomology with some suggestions for the development of hypothesis-generation and testing in ethnobiology. Journal of Ethnobiology. 1986, 6: 99-120.Google Scholar
  151. Matthiensen FA: Os escorpiões e suas relações com o homem: uma revisão. Ciência e Cultura. 1988, 40: 1168-1172.Google Scholar
  152. Pacheco JM: Etnoentomologia: o que é um inseto?. Informativo da Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil. 2001, 26: 1-5.Google Scholar
  153. Posey DA: Temas e inquirições em etnoentomologia: algumas sugestões quanto à geração de hipóteses. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. 1987, 3: 99-134.Google Scholar
  154. Posey DA: Ethnoentomological survey of Brazilian Indians. Entomology General. 1987, 12: 191-202.Google Scholar
  155. Nomura H: Os animais no folclore - aracnídeos e miriápodos. 2001, Mossoró, RN: Fundação Guimarães Duque e Fundação Vingt-un RosadoGoogle Scholar
  156. Nomura H: Curiosidades folclóricas sobre insetos. 2001, São José dos Campos, SP: Centro de Estudos da Cultura PopularGoogle Scholar
  157. Almeida DF, Barros CS: Etnomiriapodologia: Os embuás sob o ponto de vista cultural em contexto educativo. Revista Eletrônica de Humanidades do Curso de Ciências Sociais da UNIFAP. 2009, 2: without page numbersGoogle Scholar
  158. Silva T, Boccardo L, Costa-Neto EM, Jucá Chagas R: Os saberes dos moradores do povoado de Porto Alegre (Maracás, Bahia, Brasil) sobre os insetos. Boletín de la SEA. 2010, 46: 603-608.Google Scholar
  159. Ulysséa MA, Hanazaki N, Lopes BC: Percepção e uso dos insetos pelos moradores da comunidade do Ribeirão da Ilha, Santa Catarina, Brasil. Revista Biotemas. 2010, 23 (3): 191-202.Google Scholar
  160. Pezzuti JCB, Lima JP, Silva DF, Begossi A: Uses and Taboos of Turtles and Tortoises Along Rio Negro, Amazon Basin. Journal of Ethnobiology. 2010, 30: 153-168. 10.2993/0278-0771-30.1.153.Google Scholar
  161. Pezzuti JCB, Barboza RSL, Nunes I, Miorando P, Fernandes L: Etnoecologia e conservação de quelônios amazônicos: um estudo de caso. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 447-470. 1Google Scholar
  162. Alves ÂGC, Souto FJB, Leite AM: Etnoecologia dos cágados-d'água Phrynops spp. (Testudinomorpha: Chelidae) entre pescadores artesanais do açúde de Bodocongó, Campina Grande, Paraíba, Nordeste do Brasil. Sitientibus. 2002, 2: 62-68.Google Scholar
  163. Barbosa AR, Nishida AK, Costa ES, Cazé ALR: Abordagem etnoherpetológica de São José da Mata - Paraíba - Brasil. Revista de Biologia e Ciências da Terra. 2007, 7: 117-123.Google Scholar
  164. Santos-Fita D, Costa-Neto EM, Schiavetti A: 'Offensive' snakes: cultural beliefs and practices related to snakebites in a Brazilian rural settlement. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2010, 6: 1-13. 10.1186/1746-4269-6-1.Google Scholar
  165. Magalhães L: A cobra eo folclore sertanejo. Revista do Instituto do Ceará. 1969, 87: 113-123.Google Scholar
  166. Marques JGW, Guerreiro W: Répteis em uma Feira Nordestina (Feira de Santana, Bahia). Contextualização Progressiva e Análise Conexivo-Tipológica. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2007, 7: 289-295.Google Scholar
  167. Costa-Neto EM, Valverde MCC, Baptista GCS: Diálogo entre concepções prévias dos estudantes e conhecimento científico escolar: relações sobre os Amphisbaenias. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación (Online). 2008, 47:Google Scholar
  168. Mendes EG: Sapos: ficção e ciência. Ciência e Cultura. 1987, 39: 56-60.Google Scholar
  169. Nomura H: Usos e crendices sobre anfíbios. 1996, Mossoró, RN, Brazil: Fundação Vingt-un Rosado, 1Google Scholar
  170. Nomura H: Os répteis no folclore. 1996, Mossoró, RN, Brasil: Fundação Vingt-un Rosado, 1Google Scholar
  171. Alves RRN, Pereira-Filho GA, Vieira KS, Santana GG, Vieira WLS, Almeida WO: Répteis e as populações humanas no Brasil: uma abordagem etnoherpetológica. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 121-148. 1Google Scholar
  172. Amaral BD: Fishing Territoriality and Diversity Between the Ethnic Populations Ashaninka and Kaxinawá, Breu River, Brazil/Peru. Acta Amazonica. 2004, 34: 75-88. 10.1590/S0044-59672004000100011.Google Scholar
  173. Batistella AM, Castro CP, Vale JD: Conhecimento dos moradores da comunidade de Boas Novas, no Lago Janauacá - Amazonas, sobre os hábitos alimentares dos peixes da região. Acta Amazonica. 2005, 35: 51-54. 10.1590/S0044-59672005000100008.Google Scholar
  174. Begossi A, Garavello JC: Notes on the ethnoichthyology of fishermen from the Tocantins River (Brazil). Acta Amazonica. 1990, 20: 341-351.Google Scholar
  175. Begossi A, Silvano RAM, Amaral BD, Oyakama OT: Uses of Fish and Game by Inhabitants of an Extrative Reserve (Upper Juruá, Acre, Brazil). Environment, Development and Sustainability. 1999, 1: 73-93. 10.1023/A:1010075315060.Google Scholar
  176. Petrere Júnior M: Nota sobre a pesca dos índios Kayapó da aldeia de Gorotire, Rio Fresco, Pará. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. 1990, 6: 5-17.Google Scholar
  177. Ribeiro BG, Kenhíri T: Etnoictiologia desâna. Uma estratégia latino-americana para a Amazônia. Edited by: Pavan C. 1996, Brasília, Brazil: Ministério do Meio Ambiente, dos Recursos Hídricos e da Amazônia Legal, 201-217. 1Google Scholar
  178. Silva AL, Begossi A: Uso de recursos por ribeirinhos no médio rio Negro. Ecologia de Pescadores da Mata Atlântica e da Amazônia. Edited by: Begossi A, Leme A, Seixas CS, Castro F, Pezzuti J, Hanazaki N, Peroni N, Silvano RAM. 2004, São Paulo, SP, Brazil: Hucitec, 185-220.Google Scholar
  179. Brandão FC, Silva LMA: Conhecimento Ecológico Tradicional dos pescadores da Floresta Nacional do Amapá. Uakari. 2009, 4: 55-66.Google Scholar
  180. Costa-Neto EM, Dias CV, Melo MN: O conhecimento ictiológico tradicional dos pescadores da cidade de Barra, região do Médio São Francisco, Estado da Bahia, Brasil. Acta Scientiarum. 2002, 24: 561-572.Google Scholar
  181. Moura FBP, Marques JGW: Conhecimento de pescadores tradicionais sobre a dinâmica espaço-temporal de recursos naturais na Chapada Diamantina, Bahia. Biota Neotropica. 2007, 7: 119-126. 10.1590/S1676-06032007000300014.Google Scholar
  182. Moura FBP, Marques JGW: O Povo dos Marimbus: Etnoecologia de pescadores tradicionais na APA Marimbus-Iraquara. Serra do Sincora - Parque Nacional da Chapada Diamantina. Edited by: Funch LS, Funch R, Queiroz LP. 2008, Feira de Santana, BA, Brazil: Radami, 213-221. 1Google Scholar
  183. Moura FBP, Marques JGW, Nogueira EMS: "Peixe sabido, que enxerga de longe": Conhecimento ictiológico tradicional na Chapada Diamantina, Bahia. Revista Biotemas. 2008, 21: 115-123.Google Scholar
  184. Begossi A, Braga FMS: Food taboos and folk medicine among fishermen from the Tocantins River. Amazoniana. 1992, 12: 101-118.Google Scholar
  185. Silva TFP, Costa-Neto EM: Percepção de insetos por moradores da comunidade Olhos D'água, município de Cabaceiras do Paraguaçu, Bahia, Brasil. Boln SEA. 2004, 262-268.Google Scholar
  186. Silvano RAM, Begossi A: Ethnoichthyology and fish conservation in the Piracicaba River (Brazil). Journal of Ethnobiology. 2002, 22: 285-306.Google Scholar
  187. Silvano RAM, Begossi A: Seasonal dynamics of fishery at the Piracicaba River (Brazil). Fisheries Research. 2001, 51: 69-86. 10.1016/S0165-7836(00)00229-0.Google Scholar
  188. Azevedo-Santos VM, Costa-Neto EM, Lima-Stripari N: Concepção dos pescadores artesanais que utilizam o reservatório de Furnas, Estado de Minas Gerais, acerca dos recursos pesqueiros: um estudo etnoictiológico. Revista Biotemas. 2010, 23: 135-145.Google Scholar
  189. Paz VA, Begossi A: Ethnoichthyology of Galviboa fishermen of Sepetiba Bay, Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology. 1996, 16: 157-168.Google Scholar
  190. Begossi A, Figueiredo JL: Ethnoichthyology of southern coastal fishermen: cases from Búzios Island and Sepetiba Bay (Brazil). Bulletin of Marine Science. 1995, 56: 710-717.Google Scholar
  191. Begossi A, Richerson PJ: Biodiversity, family income and ecological niche: a study on the consumption of animal foods on Búzios Island (Brazil). Ecology of Food and Nutrition. 1993, 30: 51-51. 10.1080/03670244.1993.9991322.Google Scholar
  192. Begossi A: Fishing spots and sea tenure: Incipient forms of local management in Atlantic forest coastal communities. Human Ecology. 1995, 23: 387-406. 10.1007/BF01190138.Google Scholar
  193. Begossi A: The use of optimal foraging theory in the understanding of fishing strategies: A case from Sepetiba Bay (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil). Human Ecology. 1992, 20: 463-475. 10.1007/BF00890430.Google Scholar
  194. Clauzet M, Ramires M, Begossi A: A Etnoictiologia dos pescadores artesanais da Praia de Guaibim, Valença (BA), Brasil. Neotropical Biology And Conservation. 2007, 2: 136-154.Google Scholar
  195. Cordell J: The lunar-tide fishing cycle in Northeastern Brazil. Ethnology. 1974, 13: 379-392. 10.2307/3773053.Google Scholar
  196. Costa-Neto EM: A cultura pesqueira do Litoral Norte da Bahia: etnoictiologia, desenvolvimento e sustentabilidade. 2001, Macéio, Brazil: EDUFBA/EDUFAL, 1Google Scholar
  197. Costa-Neto EM, Marques JGW: Conhecimento ictiológico tradicional e a distribuição temporal e espacial de recursos pesqueiros pelos pescadores de Conde, Estado da Bahia, Brasil. Etnoecológica. 2000, 4: 56-68.Google Scholar
  198. Costa-Neto EM, Marques JGW: Etnoictiologia dos pescadores artesanais de Siribinha, município de Conde (Bahia): aspectos relacionados com a etologia dos peixes. Acta Scientiarum Biological Sciences. 2008, 22: 553-560.Google Scholar
  199. Fernandes-Pinto E, Marques JGW: Conhecimento Etnoecológico de Pescadores Artesanais de Guaraqueçaba - PR. Enciclopédia Caiçara - O Olhar do Pesquisador. Edited by: Diegues AC. 2004, São Paulo, Brazil: Editora Hucitec, 163-190. 1Google Scholar
  200. Hanazaki N, Begossi A: Fishing and Niche Dimension for Food Consumption of Caiçaras from Ponta do Almada (Brazil). Human Ecology Review. 2000, 7: 52-62.Google Scholar
  201. Hanazaki N, Begossi A: Catfish as Mullets: The Food preferences and taboos os caiçaras (Southern Atlantic Forest Coast. Interciencia. 2006, 31: 123-129.Google Scholar
  202. Mourão JS, Nordi N: Etnoictiologia de Pescadores Artesanais do Estuário do Rio Mamanguape, Paraíba, Brasil. Boletim do Instituto de Pesca. 2003, 29: 9-17.Google Scholar
  203. Mourão JS, Nordi N: Pescadores, peixes, espaço e tempo: uma abordagem Etnoecológica. Interciencia. 2006, 31: 358-363.Google Scholar
  204. Nehrer R, Begossi A: Fishing at Copacabana (Rio de Janeiro): local strategies in a global city. Ciência e Cultura. 2000, 52: 26-30.Google Scholar
  205. Pacheco RS, Marques JGW: Restrições à inserção de peixes em cadeias trófico-culturais de uma população pesqueira no Recôncavo Baiano (Acupe, Santo Amaro). Revista Ouricuri. 2009, 1: 91-114.Google Scholar
  206. Ramires M, Barrella W: Conhecimento popular sobre peixes em uma comunidade caiçara da Estação Ecológica de Juréia Itatins. Boletim do Instituto de Pescaogia. 2001, 27: 97-104.Google Scholar
  207. Ramires M, Barrella W: Ecologia da pesca artesanal em populações caiçaras da Estação Ecológica de Juréia-Itatins, São Paulo, Brasil. Interciencia. 2003, 28: 208-213.Google Scholar
  208. Ramires M, Barrella W: Etnoictiologia de Pescadores da Estação Ecológica de Juréia Itatins. Enciclopédia Caiçara. Edited by: Diegues AC. 2004, São Paulo, Brazil: NUPAUB-CEC/HUCITEC, 1: 1Google Scholar
  209. Ramires M, Molina SMG, Hanazaki N: Etnoecologia caiçara: o conhecimento dos pescadores artesanais sobre aspectos ecológicos da pesca. Biotemas. 2007, 20: 101-113.Google Scholar
  210. Rocha MSP, Mourão JS, Souto WMS, Barboza RRD, Alves RRN: Uso dos recursos pesqueiros no Estuário do Rio Mamanguape, Estado da Paraíba, Brasil. Interciencia. 2008, 33: 903-909.Google Scholar
  211. Rosa IL, Alves RRN: Pesca e comércio de cavalos-marinhos (Syngnathidae Hippocampus) no Norte e Nordeste do Brasil: subsídios para conservação e manejo. Povos e Paisagens Etnobiologia, Etnoecologia e Biodiversidade no Brasil. Edited by: Albuquerque UP, Alves AGC, Araújo TAS. 2007, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA/UFRPE, 1: 28-46.Google Scholar
  212. Rosa I, Alves RRN, Bonifacio K, Mourão JS, Osorio F, Oliveira T, Nottingham M: Fishers' knowledge and seahorse conservation in Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2005, 1: 1-12. 10.1186/1746-4269-1-1.Google Scholar
  213. Seixas CS, Begossi A: Ethnozoology of fishing communities from Ilha Grande (Atlantic forest coast, Brazil). Journal of Ethnobiology. 2001, 21: 107-135.Google Scholar
  214. Seixas C, Begoss A: Central Place optimal foraging theory: populations and individual analyses of fishing strategies at Aventureiro (Ilha Grande, Brazil). Ciência e Cultura. 2000, 52: 85-92.Google Scholar
  215. Silvano RAM, Begossi A: Local knowledge on a cosmopolitan fish Ethnoecology of Pomatomus saltatrix (Pomatomidae) in Brazil and Australia. Fisheries Research. 2005, 71: 43-59. 10.1016/j.fishres.2004.07.007.Google Scholar
  216. Silvano RAM, MacCord PFL, Lima RV, Begossi A: When does this fish spawn? Fishermen's local knowledge of migration and reproduction of Brazilian coastal fishes. Environmental Biology of Fishes. 2006, 76: 371-386. 10.1007/s10641-006-9043-2.Google Scholar
  217. Silvano RAM, Begossi A: What can be learned from fishers? An integrated survey of fishers' local ecological knowledge and bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) biology on the Brazilian coast. Hydrobiologia. 2010, 637: 3-18. 10.1007/s10750-009-9979-2.Google Scholar
  218. Souto FJB: O bosque de mangues e a pesca artesanal no Distrito de Acupe (Santo Amaro, Bahia): uma abordagem etnoecológica. Acta Scientiarum Biological Sciences. 2008, 30: 275-282.Google Scholar
  219. Reuss-Strenzel GM, Assunção MF: Etnoconhecimento ecológico dos caçadores submarinos de Ilhéus, Bahia, como subsídio à preservação do mero. Revista da Gestão Costeira Integrada. 2008, 8: 203-219.Google Scholar
  220. Begossi A: Mapping spots: fishing areas or territories among islanders of the Atlantic Forest (Brazil). Regional Environmental Change. 2001, 2: 1-12. 10.1007/s101130100022.Google Scholar
  221. Rosa IML, Alves RRN, Bonifácio KM, Osório F, Mourão JS, Oliveira TPR, Nottingham MC: Bioecologia de cavalos-marinhos (Teleostei: Syngnathidae Hippocampus) na visão de pescadores do Norte e Nordeste do Brasil. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 297-322. 1Google Scholar
  222. Begossi A, Svetlana SV, Andreoli TB, Clauzet M, Martinelli CM, Ferreira AGL, Oliveira LEC, Silvano R: Ethnobiology of snappers (Lutjanidae): target species and suggestions for management. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2011, 7:Google Scholar
  223. Thé APG, Madi E, Nordi N: Conhecimento local, regras informais e uso do peixe na pesca do alto-médio São Francisco. Águas, peixes e pescadores do São Francisco das Gerais. Edited by: Godinho HP, Godinho AL. 2003, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil: PUCMinas, 1-468.Google Scholar
  224. Hanazaki N, Begossi A: Does Fish Still Matter? Changes In The Diet Of Two Brazilian Fishing Communities. Ecology of Food and Nutrition. 2003, 42: 279-301. 10.1080/03670240390229643.Google Scholar
  225. Rossato JC: A saúva no folclore paulista. Anuário do Folclore. 1984, 14: 1-8.Google Scholar
  226. Sampaio FAC, Jucá-Chagas R, Teixeira PMM, Boccardo L: Os peixes e a pesca. Concepções de estudantes do povoado de Porto Alegre, Bahia, BA. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2006, 6: 44-57.Google Scholar
  227. Silvano RAM, Valbo-Jørgensen J: Beyond fishermen's tales: contributions of fishers' local ecological knowledge to fish ecology and fisheries management. Environment, Development and Sustainability. 2008, 10: 657-675. 10.1007/s10668-008-9149-0.Google Scholar
  228. Van Velthem LH: Os Wayana, as águas, os peixes e a pesca. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. 1990, 6: 107-116.Google Scholar
  229. Pinheiro L: Da ictiologia ao etnoconhecimento: saberes populares, percepção ambiental e senso de conservação em comunidade ribeirinha do rio Piraí, Joinville, Estado de Santa Catarina. Revista Biological Sciences, Maringá. 2004, 3: 325-334.Google Scholar
  230. Lopes P, Silvano R, Begossi A: Extractive and Sustainable Development Reserves in Brazil: resilient alternatives to fisheries?. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management. 2011, 54: 421-443. 10.1080/09640568.2010.508687.Google Scholar
  231. Rosa IL, Oliveira TPR, Osório FM, Moraes LE, Castro ALC, Barros GML, Alves RRN: Fisheries and trade of seahorses in Brazil: historical perspective, current trends, and future directions. Biodiversity and Conservation.
  232. Andrade J: Folclore na região do Pará: teredos na alimentação/profissões ribeirinhas. 1983, São Paulo: Escola de Folclore, 1Google Scholar
  233. Chaves FM, Vilas Boas JC, Anjos-Aquino EAC: A utilização dos Mollusca pelos índios bororo: uma análise do acervo etnográfico do Museu Dom Bosco. Descobrindo o museu: experiências de pesquisas e extensão no Museu Dom Bosco. Edited by: Perrelli MAdS, Albuquerque LBd, Anjos-Aquino EACd. 2005, Campo Grande: Editora UCDB, 161-166. 1Google Scholar
  234. Souza RM, Alves AGC, Alves MS: Conhecimento sobre o molusco gigante africano Achatina fulica entre estudantes de uma escola pública na Região Metropolitana do Recife. Revista Biotemas. 2007, 20: 81-89.Google Scholar
  235. Nishida AK, Nordi N, Alves RRN: Abordagem Etnoecológica da coleta de moluscos no Litoral Paraibano. Tropical Oceanography. 2004, 32: 53-68.Google Scholar
  236. Nishida AK, Nordi N, Alves RRN: Molluscs production associated to lunar-tide cycle: a case study in Paraíba State under ethnoecology viewpoint. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2006, 2: 6-10.1186/1746-4269-2-6.Google Scholar
  237. Nishida AK, Nordi N, Alves RRdN: Mollusc Gathering in Northeast Brazil: An Ethnoecological Approach. Human Ecology. 2006, 34: 133-145. 10.1007/s10745-005-9005-x.Google Scholar
  238. Souto FJB, Martins VS: Conhecimentos etnoecológicos na mariscagem de moluscos bivalves no Manguezal do Distrito de Acupe, Santo Amaro-BA. Revista Biotemas. 2009, 22 (4): 207-218.Google Scholar
  239. Martins VS, Souto FJB: Uma Análise biométrica de bivalves coletados por marisqueiras no manguezal de Acupe, Santo Amaro, Bahia: uma abordagem etnoconservacionista. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2006, 6: 98-105.Google Scholar
  240. Martins VS, Schiavetti A, Souto FJB: Ethnoecological knowledge of the artisan fishermen of octopi (Octopus spp.) in the community of Coroa Vermelha (Santa Cruz Cabrália, Bahia). Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências. 2011, 83: 513-522.Google Scholar
  241. Dias TLP, Leo Neto NA, Alves RRN: Molluscs in the marine curio and souvenir trade in NE Brazil: species composition and implications for their conservation and management. Biodiversity and Conservation.
  242. Nomura H: Os moluscos no folclore. 2001, Mossoró, RN: Fundação Guimarães Duque e Fundação Vingt-un RosadoGoogle Scholar
  243. Silva VMF, Best RC: Freshwater dolphin/fisheries interaction in the Central Amazon. Amazoniana. 1996, 14: 165-175.Google Scholar
  244. Costa-Neto EM: Os mamíferos da Chapada Diamantina e o conhecimento tradicional associado. Serra do Sincorá: Parque Nacional da Chapada Diamantina. Edited by: Funch LS, Funch RR, Queiroz LP. 2008, Feira de Santana, BA, Brazil: RADAMI, 201-211.Google Scholar
  245. Estrela AR: Etnoprimatologia y su aplicación en los planes de conservación de la Caatinga brasilera. Manual de Etnozoología: una guía teórica-práctica para investigar la interconexión del ser humano con los animales. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Santos-Fita D, Clavijo MV. 2009, Valencia, Spain: Tundra Ediciones, 1Google Scholar
  246. Sabbatini G, Stammati M, Tavares MCH, Giuliani MV, Visalberghi E: Interactions between humans and capuchin monkeys (Cebus libidinosus) in the Parque Nacional de Brasília, Brazil. Applied Animal Behaviour Science. 2006, 97: 272-283. 10.1016/j.applanim.2005.07.002.Google Scholar
  247. Ribeiro GC, Schiavetti A: Conocimiento, creencias y utilización de recursos mastofaunísticos por los pobladores de la región del Parque Estatal de la Sierra del Conduru, Bahia, Brasil. Manual de Etnozoología: una guía teórica-práctica para investigar la interconexión del ser humano con los animales. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Santos-Fita D, Clavijo MV. 2009, Valencia, Spain: Tundra Ediciones, 224-241. 1Google Scholar
  248. Pinheiro L, Cremer MJ: Etnoecologia e captura acidental de golfinhos (Cetacea: Pontoporiidae e Delphinidae) na Baía da Babitonga, Santa Catarina. Desenvolvimento e Meio Ambiente. 2003, 8: 69-75.Google Scholar
  249. Schiavetti A, Alarcon DT: As possibilidades de estudos de Sotalia guianensis (van Bénéden, 1864) através do conhecimento local do pescadores. Pesquisa e Conservação de Sotalia guianensis. Edited by: Rossi-Santos MR, Reis MdSS. 2008, Ilhéus, BA, Brazil: Editus, 189-196.Google Scholar
  250. Oliveira F, Monteiro-Filho ELA: Relação entre pescadores e botos na região de Cananéia: olhar e percepção caiçara. Enciclopédia caiçara Festas, lendas e mitos caiçaras Hucitec, São Paulo: Hucitec, 414p. Edited by: Diegues AC. 2006, São Paulo: Hucitec, USP/NUPAUB/CEC, 5: 253-270.Google Scholar
  251. Esbérard CEL: Morcego: uma vítima das superstições. Ciência Hoje. 1995, 18: 71-72.Google Scholar
  252. Gehara M, Ribeiro GC, Bisaggio EL, Andriolo A: Conhecimento popular de moradores do entorno do Parque Estadual do Ibitipoca (MG, Brasil) sobre o gênero Mazama Rafinesque, 1817 (Cervidae). Sitientibus. 2009, 9: 122-128.Google Scholar
  253. Nomura H: Os mamíferos no folclore. 1996, Mossoró, RN, Brazil: Fundação Vingt-Un Rosado, 1Google Scholar
  254. Rocha-Mendes F, Kuczach AM: Conhecimentos tradicionais sobre a mastofauna da região do Cânion do Guartelá, Estado do Paraná, sul do Brasil. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2007, 7: 323-333.Google Scholar
  255. Rocha-Mendes F, Mikich SB, Bianconi GV, Pedro WA: Mamíferos do município de Fênix, Paraná: etnozoologia e conservação. Revista Brasileira de Zoologia. 2005, 22: 991-1002. 10.1590/S0101-81752005000400027.Google Scholar
  256. Alves RRN, Campos BATP, Toledo GAC, Mourão JS, Barboza RRD, Souto WMS: Traditional uses and conservation of dolphins in Brazil. Dolphins: Anatomy, Behavior, and Threats. Edited by: PA G, Correa LM. 2010, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc, 183-195.Google Scholar
  257. Barros FB, Pereira HM, Vicente L: Use and Knowledge of the Razor-billed Curassow Pauxi tuberosa (Spix, 1825) (Galliformes, Cracidae) by a Riverine Community of the Oriental Amazonia, Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2011, 7: 1-30. 10.1186/1746-4269-7-1.PubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  258. Alves RRN, Nogueira E, Araujo H, Brooks S: Bird-keeping in the Caatinga, NE Brazil. Human Ecology. 2010, 38: 147-156. 10.1007/s10745-009-9295-5.Google Scholar
  259. Araujo HFP, Lucena RFP, Mourão JS: Prenúncio de chuvas pelas aves na percepção de moradores de comunidades rurais no município de Soledade-PB, Brasil. Interciencia. 2005, 30: 764-769.Google Scholar
  260. Rocha MSP, Cavalcanti PCM, Sousa RL, Alves RRN: Aspectos da comercialização ilegal de aves nas feiras livres de Campina Grande, Paraíba, Brasil. Revista de Biologia e Ciências da Terra. 2006, 6: 204-221.Google Scholar
  261. Santos IB, Costa-Neto EM: Estudo Etnoornitológico em uma região do semi-árido do Estado da Bahia. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2007, 7: 273-288.Google Scholar
  262. Bezerra DMMSQ, Araujo HFP, Alves RRN: The use of wild birds by rural communities in the semi-arid region of Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil. Bioremediation, Biodiversity and Bioavailability. 2011Google Scholar
  263. Saiki PTO, Guido LFE, Cunha AMO: Etnoecologia, etnotaxonomia e valoração cultural de Psittacidae em distritos rurais do Triângulo Mineiro, Brasil. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia. 2009, 17: 41-52.Google Scholar
  264. Almeida SM, Franchin AG, Marçal Júnior O: Estudo Etnoornitológico no Distrito Rural de Florentina, Município de Araguari, Região do Triângulo Mineiro, Minas Gerais. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2006, 6: 26-36.Google Scholar
  265. Farias GB, Alves AGC: Conhecimento prévio sobre a avifauna por alunos do Ensino Fundamental numa escola pública na Região Metropolitana do Recife: em busca de uma prática pedagógica culturalmente apropriada. Povos e paisagens: etnobiologia, etnoecologia e biodiversidade no Brasil. Edited by: Albuquerque UP, Alves AGC, Araújo HFP. 2007, Recife: NUPPEA/UFRPE, 48-59.Google Scholar
  266. Farias GB, Alves ÂGC: Nomenclatura e classificação etnoornitológica em fragmentos de Mata Atlântica em Igarassu, Região Metropolitana do Recife, Pernambuco. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia. 2007, 15: 358-366.Google Scholar
  267. Araujo HFP, Nishida AK: Conhecimentos de pescadores artesanais sobre a avifauna em estuários paraibanos: uma contribuição para a conservação. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2007, 7: 67-77.Google Scholar
  268. Farias GB, Alves ÂGC: Aves de Pernambuco: o estado atual do conhecimento ornitológico. Biotemas. 2009, 22: 1-10.Google Scholar
  269. Costa Neto EM: As corujas e o homem: importância ecológica e relações culturais. Ciência Hoje. 1999, 26: 74-76.Google Scholar
  270. Farias GBd, Alves ÂGC: É importante pesquisar o nome local das aves?. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia. 2007, 15: 403-408.Google Scholar
  271. Farias GB, Alves ÂGC: Aspectos históricos e conceituais da etnoornitologia. Biotemas. 2007, 20: 91-100.Google Scholar
  272. Marques JGW: Do canto bonito ao berro do bode: percepção do comportamento de vocalização em aves entre camponeses alagoanos. Revista de Etologia. 1999, special: 71-85.Google Scholar
  273. Marques JGW: O sinal das aves. Uma tipologia sugestiva para uma etnoecologia com bases semióticas. Atualidades em Etnobiologia e Etnoecologia. Edited by: Albuquerque UP, Alves AGC, Silva ACBL, Silva VA. 2002, Recife, PE, Brazil: SBEE, 1: 87-96. 1Google Scholar
  274. Nomura H: Avifauna no folclore. 1996, Mossoró, RN, Brazil: Fundação Vingt-un Rosado, 1Google Scholar
  275. Teixeira DM: Perspectivas da etno-ornitologia no Brasil: o exemplo de um estudo sobre a "tapiragem". Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Göeldi. 1992, 8: 113-121.Google Scholar
  276. Fernandes-Ferreira H, Mendonça SV, Albano C, Ferreira FS, Alves RRN: Comércio e criação de aves silvestres (Psittaciformes, Piciformes e Passeriformes) no Estado do Ceará. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 379-402. 1Google Scholar
  277. Almeida MB, Carneiro da Cunha M, Smith M: Classificação dos animais da Reserva Extrativista do Alto Juruá pelos Seringueiros. Enciclopédia da Floresta o O Alto Juruá: práticas e conhecimentos das populações. Edited by: Carneiro da Cunha M, Almeida MB. 2002, Companhia das Letras, 419-429.Google Scholar
  278. Posey DA: Hierarchy and utility in a folk taxonomic system: patterns in classification of arthropods by the Kaypó Indians of Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology. 1984, 4: 123-139.Google Scholar
  279. Costa-Neto EM: Folk Taxonomy and Cultural Significance of "Abeia" (Insecta, Hymenoptera) to the Pankarare, Northeastern Bahia State, Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology. 1998, 18: 1-13.Google Scholar
  280. Mourão JS, Araujo HFP, Almeida FS: Ethnotaxonomy of mastofauna as practised by hunters of the municipality of Paulista, state of Paraíba-Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2006, 2: 7-10.1186/1746-4269-2-7.Google Scholar
  281. Souza SP, Begossi A: Whales, dolphins or fishes? The ethnotaxonomy of cetaceans in São Sebastião, Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2007, 3: 1-9. 10.1186/1746-4269-3-1.Google Scholar
  282. Calo CFF, Schiavetti A, Cetra M: Local ecological and taxonomic knowledge of snapper fish Actinopterygii:Teleostei) held by fishermen in Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil. Neotropical Ichthyology (Impresso). 2009, 7: 403-414. 10.1590/S1679-62252009000300007.Google Scholar
  283. Marques JGW, Pose LM: Taxonomia e etnotaxonomia dos mugilídeos do Complexo Estuarino-Lagunar Mundaú-Manguaba, AL. Aspectos Morfológicos. Ciência e Cultura. 1990, 42: 532-533.Google Scholar
  284. Mourão JS, Montenegro SCS: Pescadores e Peixes: O conhecimento local e o uso da taxonomia folk baseada no modelo berliniano. 2006, Recife, PE, Brazil: Editora Livro Rápido, 2Google Scholar
  285. Mourão JS, Nordi N: Comparações entre as Taxonomias Folk e Científica para peixes do Estuário do Rio Mamanguape, Paraíba-Brasil. Interciencia. 2002, 27: 664-668.Google Scholar
  286. Mourão JS, Nordi N: Principais critérios utilizados por pescadores artesanais na taxonomia folk dos peixes do estuário do rio Mamanguape, Paraíba-Brasil. Interciencia. 2002, 27: 607-612.Google Scholar
  287. Ferreira EN, Mourão JS, Rocha PD, Nascimento DM, Bezerra DMMSQ: Folk classification of the crabs and swimming crabs (Crustacea - Brachyura) of the Mamanguape river estuary, Northeastern - Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology. 2009, 5: 1-11.Google Scholar
  288. Silva GO: Tudo que tem na terra tem no mar. A classificação dos seres vivos entre os trabalhadores da pesca em Piratininga, Rio de Janeiro. 1988, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil: FUNARTE/Instituto Nacional do Folclore, 1Google Scholar
  289. Ferreira EN, Mourão JS, Rocha PD, Nascimento DM, Bezerra DMMQS: Classificação etnobiológica de caranguejos e siris (CRUSTACEA - BRACHYURA) do estuário do rio Mamanguape, Paraíba - Brasil. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 211-232. 1Google Scholar
  290. Begossi A, Clauzet M, Figueiredo JL, Guarano L, Lima R, Lopes PFM, Souza MR, Silva AL, Silvano RAM: Are biological species and high-ranking categories real? Fish folk taxonomy in the Atlantic Forest and the Amazon (Brazil). Current Anthropology. 2008, 49: 291-302. 10.1086/527437.Google Scholar
  291. Costa-Neto EM: Ethnotaxonomy and use of bees in Northeastern Brazil. The Food Insects Newsletter. 1996, 9: 1-3.Google Scholar
  292. Teixeira DM, Papavero N, Kury LB: As aves do Pará segundo as "Memórias" de Dom Lourenço Álvares Roxo de Potflis (1752). Arquivos de Zoologia. 2010, 41: 97-131.Google Scholar
  293. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas nos séculos XVI a XVIII. 1. O descobrimento da foz do rio Amazonas por Pinzón (1500) e a primeira citação de um animal brasileiro. Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 7: 1-2.Google Scholar
  294. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 3. A relação de Francisco Vásquez sobre a viagem de Pedro de Ursúa e Lope de Aguirre (1559-1561) pelo Amazonas. Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 9: 1-5.Google Scholar
  295. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 4. Notas miscelâneas sobre relatos curtos dos séculos XVII e XVIII. Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 10: 1-4.Google Scholar
  296. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 5. Symão Estacio da Sylveira e o Intento da Jornada do Pará (1618). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 11: 1-7.Google Scholar
  297. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 6. A Relação sumaria das cousas do Maranhão de Symão Estacio da Sylveira (1624). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 12: 1-10.Google Scholar
  298. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 7. John Day e A Publication of Guiana's plantation (1632). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 12: 1-12.Google Scholar
  299. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 8. A viagem de Pedro Teixeira (1637-1639). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 14: 1-5.Google Scholar
  300. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 9. A Relación del descubrimiento del Rio de las Amazonas do Pe. Alonso de Rojas (?1639). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 15: 1-7.Google Scholar
  301. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 10. O Padre Cristóbal de Acuña (1641). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 16: 1-4.Google Scholar
  302. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 11. A Descrição do Estado do Maranhão, Pará, Corupá e Rio das Amazonas de Maurício de Heriarte (1662). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 17: 1-3.Google Scholar
  303. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 12. A viagem de la Condamine (1743). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 18: 1-7.Google Scholar
  304. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 13. Dom João de São Joseph Queiroz, Bispo do Grão-Pará (1761-1763). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 19: 1-2.Google Scholar
  305. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 14.Francisco Xavier Ribeiro de Sampaio e a primeira relação da fauna do Rio Branco (1774-1775). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 20: 1-9.Google Scholar
  306. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Luz JRP: A fauna da Amazônia brasileira nos relatos de viajantes e cronistas dos séculos XVI a XVIII. 15. O Tesouro descoberto no Rio Amazonas do Pe. João Daniel (1758-1776). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 21: 1-7.Google Scholar
  307. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: A fauna de Campos dos Goytacazes, Província do Rio de Janeiro, em 1881, segundo José Alexandre Teixeira de Mello. Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 2000, 33: 1-2.Google Scholar
  308. Carrera M: A entomologia na história natural de Plínio. Revista Brasileira de Entomologia. 1993, 37: 387-396.Google Scholar
  309. Carrera M: Escarabeídeos fúnebres e sagrados. Revista Brasileira de Entomologia. 1995, 39: 475-477.Google Scholar
  310. Galvão E: O cavalo na América indígena: nota prévia a um estudo de mudança cultural. Revista do Museu Paulista. 1963, 14: 222-232.Google Scholar
  311. Gilmore R: Fauna e etnozoologia da América do Sul tropical. Suma Etnológica Brasileira Etnobiologia. Edited by: Ribeiro D. 1986, Petrópolis, RJ, Brazil: Vozes/Finep, 189-233.Google Scholar
  312. Papavero N: A "Memoria Acêrca das Abêlhas da Provincia do Piauhí, no Imperio do Brazil" de Leonardo da Senhora das Dores Castello-Branco, (1842), segundo o autógrafo do autor no Instituto Histórico e Geográfico Brasileiro, Rio de Janeiro. I. Introdução e texto. Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 3: 1-10.Google Scholar
  313. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: Navegação do Rio Tietê, na Província de São Paulo, até o Rio Taquari, na Província do Mato Grosso, por Francisco de Oliveira Barbosa (1792), com comentários sobre a fauna. Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 2000, 36: 1-3.Google Scholar
  314. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: A fauna brasileira do "Vocabulario na lingua brasilica" de Leonardo do Valle, S. J. (1585). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 1999, 1: 1-8.Google Scholar
  315. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: A fauna de São Paulo nos séculos XVI a XVIII nos textos de viajantes, cronistas, missionários e relatos monçoeiros. 2007, São Paulo, SP, Brazil: Editora da Universidade de São PauloGoogle Scholar
  316. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: Braz da Costa Rubim e sua lista de animais da Província do Espírito Santo. Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 2000, 31: 1-2.Google Scholar
  317. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Overal WL: Notas sobre a história da zoologia do Brasil. 2. As viagens de Francisco de Melo Palheta, o introdutor do cafeeiro no Brasil. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi. 2002, 17: 181-207.Google Scholar
  318. Papavero N, Teixeira DM: A primeira menção de animais para a Capitania do Espírito Santo, no Brasil, pelo Pe. Afonso Braz, S. J. (1551). Contribuições Avulsas sobre a História Natural do Brasil. 2000, 27: 1-2.Google Scholar
  319. Papavero N, Teixeira DM, Figueiredo JL, Pujol-Luz JR: Os capítulos sobre animais dos "Dialogos Geograficos, Chronologicos, Politicos, e Naturales" (1769) de Joseph Barboza de Sáa e a primeira monografia sobre a fauna de Mato Grosso. Arquivos de Zoologia. 2009, 40: 75-154.Google Scholar
  320. Souza RF: Medicina e fauna silvestre em Minas Gerais no século XVIII. Varia Historia. 2008, 24: 273-291.Google Scholar
  321. Teixeira DM, Llorente-Bousquets J, Papavero N: Animales de la Alegoría Brasileña - Ferdinand van Kessel, 1648-1697. Ciencia y Desarrollo. 1997, 131: 36-44.Google Scholar
  322. Teixeira DM, Papavero N, Monne MA: Insetos em presépios e as "formigas vestidas" de Jules Martin (1832-1906): Uma curiosa manufatura paulista do final do século XIX. Anais do Museu Paulista. 2008, 16: 105-127. 10.1590/S0101-47142008000200004.Google Scholar
  323. Teixeira DM, Papavero N: Os animais do descobrimento: A fauna brasileira mencionada nos documentos relativos à viagem de Pedro Álvares Cabral (1500-1501). Publicações Avulsas do Museu Nacional. 2006, 1-136.Google Scholar
  324. Nomura H: História da Zoologia no Brasil - século XVII. 1996, Mossoró, RN: Fundação Vingt-un Rosado e ETFRN-UNEDGoogle Scholar
  325. Nomura H: História da Zoologia no Brasil - século XVI. 1996, Mossoró, RN: FundaçãoVingt-un Rosado e ETFRN-UNEDGoogle Scholar
  326. Nomura H: História da Zoologia no Brasil - século XVIII. 1998, Lisboa, Portugal: Museu Bocage - Museu Nacional de História NaturalGoogle Scholar
  327. Miranda EE: O descobrimento da biodiversidade. A ecologia de índios, jesuítas e leigos no século XVI. 2004, São Paulo, SP: Ed Loyola, 1Google Scholar
  328. Vanzolini PE: A contribuição zoológica dos primeiros naturalistas viajantes no Brasil. Dossiê Viajantes do Brasil, Revista USP. 1996, 30: 90-238.Google Scholar
  329. Alves RRN: Commercialization of Uranoscodon superciliosus Linnaeus, 1758 (Tropiduridae) for magical-religious purposes in North and Northeastern of Brazil. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2008, 8: 257-258.Google Scholar
  330. Cravalho MA: Shameless creatures: An ethnozoology of the Amazon River dolphin. Ethnology. 1999, 38: 47-58. 10.2307/3774086.Google Scholar
  331. Posey DA, Elisabetsky E: Conceito de animais e seus espíritos em relação a doenças e curas entre os índios Kayapó da Aldeia Gorotire, Pará. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. 1991, 7: 21-36.Google Scholar
  332. Costa-Neto EM: "Caçando" bichos na selva urbana: um estudo de caso na cidade de Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brasil. Bioikos. 2004, 18: 21-25.Google Scholar
  333. Léo Neto NA, Brooks SE, Alves RRN: From Eshu to Obatala: animals used in sacrificial rituals at Candomble "terreiros" in Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2009, 5: 1-23. 10.1186/1746-4269-5-1.Google Scholar
  334. Léo Neto NA, Alves RRN: A Natureza Sagrada do Candomblé: Análise da construção mística acerca da natureza em terreiros de Candomblé em Caruaru (PE) e Campina Grande (PB). Interciencia. 2010, 35: 568-574.Google Scholar
  335. Léo Neto NA, Alves RRN: "Sangue e música": animais utilizados em rituais de sacrifício em terreiros de Candomblé. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 495-512. 1Google Scholar
  336. Da Matta R, Soárez E: Águias, burros e borboletas: um estudo antropológico do jogo do bicho. 1999, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Rocco, 1Google Scholar
  337. Marques JGW: É Pecado Matar a Esperança, mas Todo Mundo quer Matar o Sariguê. Etnoconservação e Catolicismo Popular no Brasil. Atualidades em Etnobiologia e Etnoecologia. Edited by: Alves AGC, Lucena RFP, Albuquerque UP. 2005, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPPEA, 27-43.Google Scholar
  338. Marques JGW: Etnoecologia e Ornitomancia Macabra. Aves Alagoanas, Gente Marcada para Morrer & Mortes Anunciadas. Arte popular de Alagoas. Edited by: Pedrosa TM. 2000, Macéio, AL, Brazil: UFAL, 97-100.Google Scholar
  339. Nomura H: Usos, crendices e lendas sobre peixes. 1996, Mossoró, RN, Brazil: Fundação Vingt-Un Rosado, 1Google Scholar
  340. Teixeira DM: Um estudo de etnozoologia Karajá: o exemplo das máscaras de Aruanã. O artesão tradicional e seu papel na sociedade contemporânea. Edited by: FUNARTE/Instituto Nacional do Folclore. 1983, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: FUNARTE/Instituto Nacional do FolcloreGoogle Scholar
  341. Farias GB, Alves AGC, Marques JGW: Mythological Relations Between the "Lavandeira" Birds Fluvicola nengeta and Motacilla alba in Northeast Brazil and Northwest Spain: Possible Cultural Implications for Conservation. Journal of Ethnobiology. 2010, 30: 240-251. 10.2993/0278-0771-30.2.240.Google Scholar
  342. Marques JGW: "Pássaro" É Bom para se Pensar:Simbolismo Ascensional em uma Etnoecologia do Imaginário. Incelências Revista do Núcleo de Programas Pesquisa. 2010, 1: 6-27.Google Scholar
  343. Rosa IML, Oliveira TPR, Alves RRN: Entre o corpo e o espírito: uso medicinal e mágico-religioso de cavalos-marinhos no Brasil. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 323-346. 1Google Scholar
  344. Alves RRN, Rosa IL: Use of Tucuxi Dolphin Sotalia fluviatilis for Medicinal and Magic/Religious Purposes in North of Brazil. Human Ecology. 2008, 36: 443-447. 10.1007/s10745-008-9174-5.Google Scholar
  345. Alves RRN, Santana GG: Use and commercialization of Podocnemis expansa (Schweiger 1812) (Testudines: Podocnemididae) for medicinal purposes in two communities in North of Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2008, 4: 6-10.1186/1746-4269-4-6.Google Scholar
  346. Branch L, Silva MF: Folk medicine in Alter do Chão, Pará, Brasil. Acta Amazônica. 1983, 13: 737-797.Google Scholar
  347. Costa RPC, Silva WG: Medicina popular da Amazônia brasileira I: identificação dos ácidos graxos e triglicerídeos da banha da cobra sucuriju (Eunnects murinus). Revista da Universidade do Amazonas (Série Ciências da Saúde). 1993, 2: 73-90.Google Scholar
  348. Figueiredo N: Os 'bichos' que curam: os animais e a medicina 'folk' em Belém do Pará. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Göeldi. 1994, 10: 75-91.Google Scholar
  349. Pinto AAC, Maduro CB: Produtos e subprodutos da medicina popular comercializados na cidade de Boa Vista, Roraima. Acta Amazônica. 2003, 33: 281-290.Google Scholar
  350. Silva AL: Animais medicinais: conhecimento e uso entre as populações ribeirinhas do rio Negro, Amazonas, Brasil. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Göeldi. 2008, 3: 343-357.Google Scholar
  351. Almeida CFCBR, Albuquerque UP: Uso e conservação de plantas e animais medicinais no Estado de Pernambuco (Nordeste do Brasil): Um estudo de caso. Interciencia. 2002, 27: 276-285.Google Scholar
  352. Alves RRN, Soares TC, Mourão JS: Uso de animais medicinais na comunidade de Bom Sucesso, Soledade, Paraíba. Sitientibus Série Ciências Biológicas. 2008, 8: 142-147.Google Scholar
  353. Alves RRN, Barbosa JAA, Santos SLDX, Souto WMS, Barboza RRD: Animal-based Remedies as Complementary Medicines in the Semi-arid Region of Northeastern Brazil. eCAM. 2009, nep134-Google Scholar
  354. Alves RRN, Lima HN, Tavares MC, Souto WMS, Barboza RRD, Vasconcellos A: Animal-based remedies as complementary medicines in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Brazil. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2008, 8: 44-10.1186/1472-6882-8-44.PubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  355. Alves RRN, Oliveira MGG, Barboza RRD, Singh R, Lopez LLC: Medicinal Animals as Therapeutic Alternative in a Semi-Arid Region of Northeastern Brazil. Research in Complementary Medicine. 2009, 16: 305-312.Google Scholar
  356. Alves RRN, Oliveira MdGG, Barboza RRD, Lopez LCS: An ethnozoological survey of medicinal animals commercialized in the markets of Campina Grande, NE Brazil. Human Ecology Review. 2010, 17: 11-17.Google Scholar
  357. Andrade JN, Costa-Neto EM: O comércio de produtos zooterápicos na cidade de Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brasil. Sitientibus. 2006, 6: 37-43.Google Scholar
  358. Andrade JN, Costa-Neto EM: Primeiro registro da utilização medicinal de recursos pesqueiros na cidade de São Félix, Estado da Bahia, Brasil. Acta Sci Biol Sci. 2005, 27: 177-183.Google Scholar
  359. Barboza RRD, Souto WMS, Mourão JS: The use of zootherapeutics in folk veterinary medicine in the district of Cubati, Paraíba State, Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2007, 3: 14-10.1186/1746-4269-3-14.Google Scholar
  360. Confessor M, Mendonca L, Mourao J, Alves R: Animals to heal animals: ethnoveterinary practices in semi-arid region, Northeastern Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2009, 5: 37-10.1186/1746-4269-5-37.PubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  361. Costa-Neto EM: A zooterapia popular no Estado da Bahia: registro de novas espécies animais utilizadas como recursos medicinais. Ciência & Saúde Coletiva. 2011, 16: 1639-1650.Google Scholar
  362. Costa-Neto EM: Conhecimento e usos tradicionais de recursos faunísticos por uma comunidade Afro-Brasileira. Resultados preliminares. Interciencia. 2000, 25: 423-431.Google Scholar
  363. Costa-Neto EM: The Use of Insects in Folk Medicine in the State of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil, With Notes on Insects Reported Elsewhere in Brazilian Folk Medicine. Human Ecology. 2002, 30: 245-263. 10.1023/A:1015696830997.Google Scholar
  364. Costa-Neto EM, Oliveira MVM: Cockroach is Good for Asthma: Zootherapeutic Practices in Northeastern Brazil. Human Ecology Review. 2000, 7: 41-51.Google Scholar
  365. Costa-Neto EM, Pacheco JM: Utilização medicinal de insetos no povoado de Pedra Branca, Santa Terezinha, Bahia, Brasil. Biotemas. 2005, 18: 113-133.Google Scholar
  366. Costa-Neto EM: Faunistc Resources used as medicines by an Afro-brazilian community from Chapada Diamantina National Park, State of Bahia-Brazil. Sitientibus. 1996, 211-219.Google Scholar
  367. Costa-Neto EM: Healing with animals in Feira de Santana City, Bahia, Brazil. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 1999, 65: 225-230. 10.1016/S0378-8741(98)00158-5.Google Scholar
  368. Costa-Neto EM: Recursos animais utilizados na medicina tradicional dos índios Pankararé que habitam o Nordeste do Estado da Bahia, Brasil. Actualidades Biologicas. 1999, 21: 69-79.Google Scholar
  369. Costa-Neto EM: Traditional use and sale of animals as medicines in Feira de Santana City, Bahia, Brazil. Indigenous Knowledge and Development Monitor. 1999, 7: 6-9.Google Scholar
  370. Ferreira FS, Brito S, Ribeiro S, Saraiva A, Almeida W, Alves RRN: Animal-based folk remedies sold in public markets in Crato and Juazeiro do Norte, Ceara, Brazil. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2009, 9: 17-10.1186/1472-6882-9-17.PubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  371. Ferreira FS, Brito S, Ribeiro S, Almeida W, Alves RRN: Zootherapeutics utilized by residents of the community Poco Dantas, Crato-CE, Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2009, 5: 21-10.1186/1746-4269-5-21.PubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  372. Moura FBP, Marques JGW: Zooterapia popular na Chapada Diamantina: uma Medicina incidental?. Ciência & Saúde Coletiva. 2008, 13: 2179-2188.Google Scholar
  373. Souto WMS, Mourão JS, Barboza RRD, Rocha MSP, Alves RRN: Animal-based medicines used in ethnoveterinary practices in the semi-arid region of Northeastern Brazil. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências. 2010,Google Scholar
  374. Barbosa JAA, Alves RRN: "Um chá de que?" - Animais Utilizados no Preparo tradicional de Bebidas Medicinais no Agreste Paraibano. BioFar. 2010, 4 (2): 1-12.Google Scholar
  375. Barboza RRD, Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS: Etnoveterinária: o conhecimento milenar que cura e trata os animais. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 103-124. 1Google Scholar
  376. Silva NLG, Ferreira FS, Coutinho HDM, Alves RRN: Zooterápicos utilizados em comunidades rurais do município de Sumé, semiárido da Paraíba, Nordeste do Brasil. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 243-267. 1Google Scholar
  377. Souto WMS, Alves RRN, Confessor MVA, Barboza RRD, Mourão JS, Mendonça LET: A Zooterapia na Etnoveterinária do semi-árido paraibano. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 423-446. 1Google Scholar
  378. Souto WMS, Mourão JS, Barboza RRD, Alves RRN: Parallels between zootherapeutic practices in Ethnoveterinary and Human Complementary Medicine in NE Brazil. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2011, 134 (3): 753-767. 10.1016/j.jep.2011.01.041.Google Scholar
  379. Costa-Neto EM: Animal Species Traded as Ethnomedicinal Resources in the Federal District, Central West Region of Brazil. The Open Complementary Medicine Journal. 2010, 2: 24-30. 10.2174/1876391X01002020024.Google Scholar
  380. Oliveira ES, Torres DF, Brooks SE, Alves RRN: The medicinal animal markets in the metropolitan region of Natal City, Northeastern Brazil. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2010, 130 (1): 54-60. 10.1016/j.jep.2010.04.010.Google Scholar
  381. Pessoa RS, Almeida AV, Alves ÂGC, Melo LEH: A "maçã-do-boi" (Bezoário): Etnomedicina, História e Ciência. Sitientibus. 2002, 2: 55-61.Google Scholar
  382. Silva MLVd, Alves ÂGC, Almeida AVd: A zooterapia no Recife (Pernambuco): uma articulação entre as práticas e a história. Biotemas. 2004, 17: 95-116.Google Scholar
  383. Alves RRN: Use of Marine Turtles in Zootherapy in Northeast Brazil. Marine Turtle Newsletter. 2006, 112: 16-17.Google Scholar
  384. Alves RRN, Filho GAP, Lima YCC: Snakes used in Ethnomedicine in Northeast Brazil. Environment, Development and Sustainability. 2006, 9: 455-464.Google Scholar
  385. Alves RRN, Rosa IL: Zootherapeutic practices among fishing communities in North and Northeast Brazil: A comparison. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2007, 111: 82-103. 10.1016/j.jep.2006.10.033.Google Scholar
  386. Alves RRN, Rosa IL: From cnidarians to mammals: The use of animals as remedies in fishing communities in NE Brazil. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2006, 107: 259-276. 10.1016/j.jep.2006.03.007.Google Scholar
  387. Begossi A: Food taboos at Búzios Island (Brazil): their significance and relation to folk medicine. Journal of Ethnobiology. 1992, 12: 117-139.Google Scholar
  388. Costa-Neto EM, Marques JGW: Faunistic resources used as medicines by artisanal fishermen from Siribinha Beach, State of Bahia, Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology. 2000, 20: 93-109.Google Scholar
  389. Alves RRN: Fauna used in popular medicine in Northeast Brazil. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2009, 5: 1-30. 10.1186/1746-4269-5-1.PubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  390. Alves RRN, Pereira Filho GA: Commercialization and use of snakes in North and Northeastern Brazil: implications for conservation and management. Biodivers Conserv. 2007, 16: 969-985. 10.1007/s10531-006-9036-7.Google Scholar
  391. Alves RRN, Pereira Filho GA: Commercialization and use of snakes in North and Northeastern Brazil: implications for conservation and management. Vertebrate Conservation and Biodiversity. Edited by: Hawksworth DL, Bull AT. 2007, Amsterdan: Springer Netherlands, 143-159. 1Google Scholar
  392. Begossi A, Hanazaki N, Ramos R: Healthy fish: medicinal and recommended species in the Amazon and in the Atlantic Forest coast (Brazil). Eating and Healing, traditional food as medicine. Edited by: Pieroni A, Price L. 2006, New York: The Haworth Press, 237-250. 1Google Scholar
  393. Alves RRN, Barboza RRD, Souto MSW, Mourão JS: Utilization of Bovids in traditional folk medicine and their implications for conservation. Environmental Research Journal. 2011, 5: 547-562.Google Scholar
  394. Alves RRN, Rosa IL: Medicinal animals for the treatment of asthma in Brazil. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2008, 14: 350-351. 10.1089/acm.2008.0032.Google Scholar
  395. Alves RRN, Rosa IL, Santana GG: The Role of Animal-derived Remedies as Complementary Medicine in Brazil. BioScience. 2007, 57: 949-955. 10.1641/B571107.Google Scholar
  396. Alves RRN, Silva CC, Barboza RRD, Souto WMS: Zootherapy as an alternative therapeutic in South America. Journal of Alternative Medicine Research. 2009, 1: 21-47.Google Scholar
  397. Alves RRN, Silva CC, Barboza RRD, Souto WMS: Zootherapy as alternative therapeutic in South America. Low Incomes: Social, Health and Educational Impacts. Edited by: Levine JK. 2009, New York, USA: Nova Science PublishersGoogle Scholar
  398. Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Barboza RRD: Primates in traditional folk medicine: a world overview. Mammal Review. 2010, 40: 155-180. 10.1111/j.1365-2907.2010.00158.x.Google Scholar
  399. Alves RRN, Vieira WLS, Santana GG: Reptiles used in traditional folk medicine: conservation implications. Biodiversity and Conservation. 2008, 17 (8): 2037-2049. 10.1007/s10531-007-9305-0.Google Scholar
  400. Alves RRN: Zooterapia: importancia, usos e implicaciones conservacionistas. Manual de Etnozoología: una guía teórica-práctica para investigar la interconexión del ser humano con los animales. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Santos-Fita D, Clavijo MV. 2009, Valencia, Spain: Tundra Ediciones, 1Google Scholar
  401. Alves RRN, Neto NAL, Brooks SE, Albuquerque UP: Commercialization of animal-derived remedies as complementary medicine in the semi-arid region of Northeastern Brazil. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2009, 124: 600-608. 10.1016/j.jep.2009.04.049.Google Scholar
  402. Carrera M: Terapêutica entomológica. Revista Brasileira de Entomologia. 1993, 37: 193-198.Google Scholar
  403. Costa-Neto EM: Implications and applications of folk zootherapy in the state of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Sustainable Development. 2004, 12: 161-174. 10.1002/sd.234.Google Scholar
  404. Costa-Neto EM: Etnoentomologia alagoana, com ênfase na utilização medicinal de insetos. 1994, Macéio, AL, Brasil: Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de AlagoasGoogle Scholar
  405. Costa-Neto EM: Barata é um santo remédio: introdução à zooterapia popular no estado da Bahia. 1999, Feira de Santana, Brazil: EdUEFS, 1Google Scholar
  406. Costa-Neto EM: Honey bees from Brazil: diversity of insect-product used by the Pankararé. Honey Bee. 1999, 10: 17-18.Google Scholar
  407. Francis DG: Equoterapia: recurso inovador para reabilitação física e mental. Anais de Etologia. 1996, 14: 59-63.Google Scholar
  408. Aguiar JH, Francis DG: Equoterapia. Recurso inovador para reabilitacao fisica e mental. Veterinaria Noticias (Brazil). 1998, 4: 130-134.Google Scholar
  409. Marques JG, Costa-Neto EM: Insects as folk medicines in the State of Alagoas, Brazil. The Food Inse News. 1997, 10: 7-10.Google Scholar
  410. Marques JGW, Costa-Neto EM: Insect cure for ailments. Honey Bee. 1999, 10: 1-17.Google Scholar
  411. Marques JGW: Insects as folk medicines in the State of Alagoas, Brazil. Insect Food Newsletter. 1995, 1: 75-Google Scholar
  412. Marques JGW: Fauna medicinal: Recurso do ambiente ou ameaça à biodiversidade?. Mutum. 1997, 1: 4-Google Scholar
  413. Nogueira D: As qualidades ocultas dos crustáceos. Ciência Hoje. 1999, 25: 47-Google Scholar
  414. Souto WMS, Barboza RRD, Mourão JS, Alves RRN: Zootherapy in Brazil: An Urgent Necessity of Interdisciplinary Studies. West Indian Medical Journal. 2009, 58: 494-495.Google Scholar
  415. Almeida AV: Prescrições zooterápicas indígenas brasileiras nas obras de Guilherme Piso (1611-1679). Atualidades em Etnobiologia e Etnoecologia. Edited by: Alves AGC, Lucena RFP, Albuquerque UP. 2005, Recife, Brazil: Sociedade Brasileira de Etnobiologia e Etnoecologia, Nuppea, 47-60. 1Google Scholar
  416. Alves RRN, Rosa IL: Trade of animals used in Brazilian traditional medicine: trends and implications for conservation. Human Ecology. 2010, 38: 691-704. 10.1007/s10745-010-9352-0.Google Scholar
  417. Alves RRN, Barboza RRD, Souto WMS: Endangered Felidae Used in Traditional Medicine. Endangered Species: New Research. Edited by: Columbus A, Kuznetsov L. 2009, Hauppauge, NY, EUA: Nova Science Publishers, Inc, 343-356.Google Scholar
  418. Alves RRN, Barboza RRD, Souto WMS: Endangered Felidae used in Traditional Medicines. International Journal of Medical and Biological Frontiers. 2009, 15: 357-370.Google Scholar
  419. Alves RRN, Barboza RRD, Souto WMS, Mourão JS: Utilization of Bovids in Traditional Folk Medicine and Their Implications for Conservation. Conservation of Natural Resources. Edited by: Kudrow NJ. 2009, Hauppauge, NY, EUA: Nova Science Publishers, Inc, 191-206.Google Scholar
  420. Alves RRN, Barboza RRD, Souto WMS: A Global overview of canids used in traditional medicines. Biodiversity and Conservation. 2010, 19: 1513-1522. 10.1007/s10531-010-9805-1.Google Scholar
  421. Alves RRN, Dias TLP: Usos de invertebrados na medicina popular no Brasil e suas implicações para conservação. Tropical Conservation Science. 2010, 3: 159-174.Google Scholar
  422. Almeida AV: A zooterapia adotada pelos médicos Simão Pinheiro Morão (c. 1618-1685) e João Ferreyra da Rosa (c. 1659-1725) em Pernambuco no final do século XVII. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 55-74. 1Google Scholar
  423. Alves RRN: O comércio de recursos zooterápicos. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 159-176. 1Google Scholar
  424. Bomfim GF, Costa-Neto EM, Uetanabaro APT: Cupinzeiros: utilização na medicina tradicional e avaliação da atividade antimicrobiana in vitro. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 177-188. 1Google Scholar
  425. Chemas RC: A zooterapia no âmbito da medicina civilizada. I. Organoterapia humana e animal stricto sensu. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 75-102. 1Google Scholar
  426. Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN: Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 1Google Scholar
  427. Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN: Estado da arte da zooterapia popular no Brasil. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 13-54. 1Google Scholar
  428. Alves RRN, Léo Neto NA, Santana GG, Vieira WLS, Almeida WO: Reptiles used for medicinal and magic religious purposes in Brazil. Applied Herpetology. 2009, 6: 257-274. 10.1163/157075409X432913.Google Scholar
  429. Oliva VNLS: Terapia Assistida por Animais. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 125-140. 1Google Scholar
  430. Ribeiro GC, Pereira JPR, Docio L, Alarcon DT, Schiavetti A: Zooterápicos utilizados no sul da Bahia. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 221-242. 1Google Scholar
  431. Alves RRN, Alves HN: The faunal drugstore: Animal-based remedies used in traditional medicines in Latin America. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2011, 7:Google Scholar
  432. Coimbra CEA: Estudos de ecologia humana entre os Suruí do Parque Indígena Aripuanã, Rondônia. Aspectos alimentares. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. 1985, 2: 57-87.Google Scholar
  433. Coimbra CEA: Estudos de ecologia humana entre os Suruí do Parque Indígena Aripuanã, Rondônia. Elementos de etnozoologia. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. 1985, 2: 9-36.Google Scholar
  434. Carvalho JCM, Lima PE, Galvão E: Observações zoológicas e antropológicas na região dos formadores do Xingu. Publicações Avulsas do Museu Nacional. 1949, 5: 1-49.Google Scholar
  435. Pezzuti JCB, Chaves RP: Etnografia e uso dos recursos naturais pelos Índios Deni, Amazonas, Brasil. Acta Amazonica. 2009, 39: 121-138. 10.1590/S0044-59672009000100013.Google Scholar
  436. Silva AL: Comida de gente: preferências e tabus alimentares entre os ribeirinhos do Médio Rio Negro (Amazonas, Brasil). Revista de Antropologia. 2007, 50: 125-179. 10.1590/S0034-77012007000100004.Google Scholar
  437. Silva AL, Begossi A: Biodiversity, food consumption and ecological niche dimension: a study case of the riverine populations from the Rio Negro, Amazonia, Brazil. Environment, Development and Sustainability. 2009, 11 (3): 489-507. 10.1007/s10668-007-9126-z.Google Scholar
  438. Smith NJ: Spotted cats and the Amazon skin trade. Orxy. 1976, 13: 362-371. 10.1017/S0030605300014095.Google Scholar
  439. Pezzuti J, Chaves RP: Etnografia e manejo de recursos naturais pelos índios Deni, Amazonas, Brasil. Acta Amazonica. 2009, 39: 121-138. 10.1590/S0044-59672009000100013.Google Scholar
  440. Terra AK, Rebêlo GH: O uso da fauna pelos moradores da Comunidade São João e Colônia Central. Biotupé: Meio Físico, Diversidade Biológica e Sociocultural do Baixo Rio Negro, Amazônia Central. Edited by: Nelson E, Marques F, Vizoni V, Melo S. 2005, Manaus, Brazil: INPA, 141-153. 1Google Scholar
  441. Bandeira FPSFC: Etnobiologia Pankararé. 1993, Salvador, Bahia: Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 1Google Scholar
  442. Lima KEC, Vasconcelos SD: Acidentes com animais peçonhentos: um estudo etnozoológico com agricultores de Tacaratu, sertão de Pernambuco. Sitientibus. 2006, 6: 138-144.Google Scholar
  443. Silva TS, Freire EMX: Fauna e Flora da Estação Ecológica do Seridó, Rio Grande do Norte: percepções e usos pelas comunidades do seu entorno. Recursos Naturais das Caatingas: uma visão multidisciplinar. Edited by: Freire EMX. 2009, Natal, RN, Brazil: UFRN, 85-129. 1Google Scholar
  444. Hoefle SW: O Sertanejo e os Bichos: Cognição Ambiental na Zona Semi-Árida Nordestina. Revista da Antropologia. 1990, 33: 47-74.Google Scholar
  445. Carvalho JCM: Relações entre os índios do Alto Xingu ea fauna regional. Publicações avulsas do Museu Nacional. 1951, 7:Google Scholar
  446. Setz EZF: Animals in the Nambiquara diet: Methods of collection and processing. Journal of Ethnobiology. 1991, 11: 1-22.Google Scholar
  447. Thé APG, Nordi N: Common Property Resource System in a Fishery of the San Francisco River, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Human Ecology Review. 2006, 13: 1-10.Google Scholar
  448. Begossi A, Madi E, Fonseca M, Castelo Branco P, Silvano RAM: Pesca e consumo de pescado: uso de recursos por populações ribeirinhas do Piracicaba. Caderno 2 - Qualidade Ambiental e Desenvolvimento regional nas bacias dos Rios Piacicaba e Capivari. Edited by: Hogan D. 1998, São Paulo: UNICAMPGoogle Scholar
  449. MacCord PF, Begossi A: Dietary changes over time in a caiçara community from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Ecology and Society. 2006, 11: 38-Google Scholar
  450. Castro F, Begossi A: Ecology of fishing on the Grande River (Brazil): technology and territorial rights. Fisheries Research. 1995, 23: 361-373. 10.1016/0165-7836(94)00343-U.Google Scholar
  451. Castro F, Begossi A: Fishing at Rio Grande (Brazil): ecological niche and competition. Human Ecology. 1996, 24: 401-411. 10.1007/BF02169397.Google Scholar
  452. Torres DF, Oliveira ES, Alves RRN, Vasconcellos A: Etnobotânica e Etnozoologia em Unidades de Conservação: Uso da biodiversidade na Apa de Genipabu, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Interciencia. 2009, 34: 623-629.Google Scholar
  453. Oliveira ES, Torres DdF, Alves RRN, Vasconcellos A: Etnozoologia em áreas protegidas: uso da fauna por populações locais na APA Bonfim/Guaraíras, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 403-422. 1Google Scholar
  454. Alves MS, Silva MA, Júnior MM, Paranaguá MN, Pinto SL: Zooartesanato comercializado em Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Revista Brasileira de Zoociências. 2006, 8: 99-109.Google Scholar
  455. Alarcon DT, Schiavetti A: O conhecimento dos pescadores artesanais de Itacaré sobre a fauna de vertebrados (não peixes) associados às atividades pesqueiras. Gerenciamento Costeiro Integrado. 2005, 4: 1-4.Google Scholar
  456. Alves RRN, Nishida AK: Aspectos socioeconômicos e percepção ambiental dos catadores de caranguejo-uçá Ucides cordatus cordatus (L. 1763) (Decapoda, Brachyura) do estuário do Rio Mamanguape, Nordeste do Brasil. Interciencia. 2003, 28: 36-43.Google Scholar
  457. Alves R, Nishida A, Hernandez M: Environmental perception of gatherers of the crab 'caranguejo-uca' (Ucides cordatus, Decapoda, Brachyura) affecting their collection attitudes. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2005, 1: 10-10.1186/1746-4269-1-10.PubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  458. Begossi A: The fishers and buyers from Buzios Island (Brazil): Kin ties and production. Ciência e Cultura (SBPC). 1996, 48: 142-147.Google Scholar
  459. Begossi A, Richerson PJ: The animal diet of families from Búzios island (Brazil): An optimal foraging approach. Journal of Human Ecology. 1992, 3: 433-458.Google Scholar
  460. Costa-Neto EM: Restrições e preferências alimentares em comunidades de pescadores do município do Conde, Estado da Bahia, Brasil. Revista de Nutrição. 2000, 13: 117-126.Google Scholar
  461. Nishida AK, Nordi N, Alves RRN: Aspectos socioeconômicos dos catadores de moluscos do litoral paraibano, Nordeste do Brasil. Revista de Biologia e Ciências da Terra. 2008, 8: 207-215.Google Scholar
  462. Nishida AK, Nordi N, Alves RRN: Embarcações utilizadas por pescadores estuarinos da Paraíba, Nordeste Brasil. Revista de Biologia e Farmácia. 2008, 3: 1-8.Google Scholar
  463. Souto FJB: Sociobiodiversidade na pesca artesanal do litoral da Bahia. Atualidades em Etnobiologia e Etnoecologia. Edited by: Kubo RR, Bassi JB, Souza GC, Alencar NL, Medeiros PM, Albuquerque UP. 2006, Recife, PE, Brazil: Livro Rápido, 3: 259-274.Google Scholar
  464. Docio L, Razera JCC, Pinheiro US: Representações sociais dos moradores da Baía de Camamu sobre o Filo Porifera. Ciência & Educação. 2009, 15: 613-629.Google Scholar
  465. Nishida AK, Nordi N, Alves RRN: The lunar-tide cycle viewed by crustacean and mollusc gatherers in the State of Paraíba, Northeast Brazil and their influence in collection attitudes. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. 2006, 2: 1-12. 10.1186/1746-4269-2-1.PubMed CentralGoogle Scholar
  466. Monteles JS, Castro TCS, Viana DCP, Conceição FS, França VL, Funo ICSA: Percepção socio-ambiental das marisqueiras no município de Raposa, Maranhão, Brasil. Revista Brasileira de Engenharia de Pesca. 2009, 4: 34-45.Google Scholar
  467. Silva GS, Mello RL, Nascimento AE, Messias A, Araújo SFS: A sustentabilidade ecológica das atividades pesqueiras artesanais e a relação com a malacofauna no manguezal do Rio Formoso-PE-Brasil. Trabalhos Oceanográficos. 2000, 28: 195-207.Google Scholar
  468. Botelho ERO, Santos MCF: Cata de crustáceos e moluscos no manguezal do Rio Camaragibe - Estado de Alagoas: Aspectos Sócio-ambiental e Técnico-econômico. Boletim Técnico Científico da CEPENE. 2005, 13: 77-96.Google Scholar
  469. Clauzet M, Ramires M, Barella W: Pesca Artesanal e conhecimento local de duas populações caiçaras (Enseada do mar virado e Barra Una) no litoral de São Paulo. Multiciência. 2005, 4: 1-22.Google Scholar
  470. Bahia NCF, Bondioli ACV: Interação das tartarugas marinhas com a pesca artesanal de cerco-fixo em Cananéia, litoral sul de São Paulo. Revista Biotemas. 2010, 23 (3): 203-213.Google Scholar
  471. Docio L, Tolentino-Lima MA, Costa-Neto EM, Jucá-Chagas R, Pinheiro U: Interações ecológicas de esponjas marinhas (Animalia, Porifera) segundo pescadores artesanais da Baía de Camamu, Bahia, Brasil. Revista Biotemas. 2010, 23 (3): 181-189.Google Scholar
  472. Zappes CA, Nery MF, Andriolo A, Simão SM: Ethnobiology and photo-identification: identifying anthropic impacts on boto-cinza dolphin Sotalia guianensis in Sepetiba Bay, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Biociências. 2010, 8 (2): 221-224.Google Scholar
  473. Alves HN, Nordi N, Nishida AK, Alves RRN: Perfil nutricional de catadores de Caranguejo-uçá (U. Cordatus) do distrito de Várzea Nova, Santa Rita/PB. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 251-276. 1Google Scholar
  474. Alves MS, Silva MA, Pinto SL: Perfil sócio-econômico dos atores envolvidos na produção e comercialização de zooartesanato em Recife, Pernambuco - Brasil. Revista Nordestina de Zoologia. 2010, 4: 97-104.Google Scholar
  475. Dias TLP, Alves RRN, Léo Neto NA: Zooartesanato marinho da Paraíba. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 513-534. 1Google Scholar
  476. Pinto MF, Silva JRF, Alves RRN, Nishida AK: Os animais do manguezal do estuário do Rio Jaguaribe, Aracati, Ceará - Uma abordagem etnozoológica. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 233-250. 1Google Scholar
  477. Pieve SMN, Kubo RR, Coelho-de-Souza G: Pescadores da Lagoa Mirim Etnoecologia e Resiliência. 2009, Brasília, DF, Brazil: Ministério do Desenvolvimento Agrário do Brasil, 1Google Scholar
  478. Begossi A, Hanazaki N, Ramos RM: Food Chain and the Reasons for Fish Food Taboos among Amazonian and Atlantic Forest Fishers (Brazil). Ecological Applications. 2004, 14: 1334-1343. 10.1890/03-5072.Google Scholar
  479. Magalhães A, Costa RM, Silva Rd, Pereira LCC: The role of women in the mangrove crab (Ucides cordatus, Ocypodidae) production process in North Brazil (Amazon region, Pará). Ecological Economics. 2007, 61: 559-565. 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2006.05.013.Google Scholar
  480. Ayres OM: Os animais dos Campos Gerais (PR): Impactos ambientais noticiados pela imprensa regional. Publicatio UEPG: Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde. 2006, 12: 7-19.Google Scholar
  481. Baldus H: Vocabulário zoológico Kaingang. Arquivos do Museu Paranaense. 1947, 6: 149-160.Google Scholar
  482. Bizerril MXA, Andrade TCS: Knowledge of the urban population about fauna: Comparison between Brazilian and exotic animals. Ciencia e Cultura. 1999, 51: 38-41.Google Scholar
  483. Câmara Cascudo L: Tradições populares da pecuária nordestina. 1956, Ministério da Agricultura, Serviço de Informação Agrícola, 1Google Scholar
  484. Cavallini MM, Nordi N: Ecological niche of family farmers in southern Minas Gerais state (Brazil). Brazilian Journal of Biology. 2005, 65: 61-66.Google Scholar
  485. Costa Neto EM, Santos-Fita D, Vargas-Clavijo M: Manual de Etnozoología: Una guía teórico-práctica para investigar la interconexión del ser humano con los animales. 2009, Valencia, Spain: Tundra Ediciones, 1Google Scholar
  486. Costa-Neto EM: Ethnozoology of the Semi-arid of Bahia: Study cases. Towards greater knowledge of the Brazilian Semi-arid biodiversity. Edited by: Queiroz LPd, Rapini A, Giulietti AM. 2006, Brasília, Brazil: Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia, 109-112.Google Scholar
  487. Gurgel-Gonçalves R: Etnoparasitología. Manual de Etnozoología: una guía teórica-práctica para investigar la interconexión del ser humano con los animales. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Santos-Fita D, Clavijo MV. 2009, Valencia, Spain: Tundra Ediciones, 176-199. 1Google Scholar
  488. Jalles Filho E: Perspectivas darwinistas no estudo de sociedades caçadoras e coletoras: etnografia e etnoarqueologia. Anais de Etologia. 1996, 14: 19-27.Google Scholar
  489. Luiz MSF, Bertazzoni EC, Vilas Boas JC, Perrelli MAS: Contribuições à etnozoologia xavante: estudos dos artefatos expostos no Museu Dom Bosco, Campo Grande-MS. Descobrindo o Museu Dom Bosco: Experiencias de pesquisa e extensão no Museu Dom Bosco. Edited by: Perrelli MAS, Albuquerque LB, Anjos-Aquino EA. 2005, Campo Grande, MS, Brazil: Editora UCDB, 173-178. 1Google Scholar
  490. Marques JGW: Pescando pescadores. Ciência e etnociência em uma perspectiva ecológica. 2001, São Paulo, Brazil: NUPAUB, 2Google Scholar
  491. Marques JGW: Pescando Pescadores: Etnoecologia abrangente no baixo São Francisco Alagoano. 1995, São Paulo, Brazil: NUPAUB/USP, 1Google Scholar
  492. Paiva MP, Campos E: Fauna do nordeste do Brasil: conhecimento científico e popular. 1995, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil: Banco do Nordeste, 1Google Scholar
  493. Vanzolini PE: Notas sobre a Zoologia dos índios Canela. Revista do Museu Paulista. 1958, 10: 155-171.Google Scholar
  494. Alves RRN, Silva CC, Alves HN: Aspectos sócio-econômicos do comércio de plantas e animais medicinais em área metropolitanas do Norte e Nordeste do Brasil. Revista de Biologia e Ciências da Terra. 2008, 8: 181-189.Google Scholar
  495. Nomura H: Folclore dos animais inferiores. 2003, Mossoró, RN: Fundação Vingt-un RosadoGoogle Scholar
  496. Alves AGC, Pires DAF, Ribeiro MN: Conhecimento local e produção animal: Uma perspectiva baseada na Etnozootecnia. Arch Zootec. 2010, 59: 45-56.Google Scholar
  497. Marques JGW, Alves AGC, Souto FJB, Peroni N: O Camboeiro de Setembro e as Ladainhas de Maio: Comunidades Tradicionais Pesqueiras do Brasil e sua Inserção no Nicho Ecológico. Etnoecologia em Perspectiva Natureza, Cultura e Conservação. Edited by: Alves AGC, Souto FJB, Peroni N. 2010, Recife, PE: NUPEEA, 3: 129-141.Google Scholar
  498. Alves RRN, Souto WMS: Panorama atual, avanços e perspectivas futuras para Etnozoologia no Brasil. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 41-56. 1Google Scholar
  499. Alves RRN, Souto WMS: Desafios e dificuldades associadas as pesquisas etnozoológicas no Brasil. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 57-66. 1Google Scholar
  500. Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS: A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 1Google Scholar
  501. Ferreira FS, Brito SV, Fernandes-Ferreira H, Alves RRN: Prospecção biológica, recursos zooterápicos e sustentabilidade. Zooterapia: Os Animais na Medicina Popular Brasileira. Edited by: Costa-Neto EM, Alves RRN. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 2: 141-158. 1Google Scholar
  502. Lopez LCS, Souto WMS, Ferreira FS, Alves RRN: Uma perspectiva de ecologia de comunidades aplicada à análise de dados de etnozoologia. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 535-550. 1Google Scholar
  503. Nishida AK, Nascimento RQ, Pinto MF, Menezes VC, Maia GC: Tecnologia rudimentar empregada no beneficiamento de mariscos no litoral paraibano versus pressão sobre o estoque pesqueiro. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 177-192. 1Google Scholar
  504. Santos LD, Costa-Neto EM: Registro dos usos culturais de esponjas (Animalia Porifera) no Brasil e no mundo. Sistemas biocognitivos tradicionales: Paradigmas en la conservación biológica y el fortalecimiento cultural. Edited by: Fuentes AM, Silva MTP, Méndez RM, Azúa RV, Correa PM, Santillán TVG. 2010, Pachuca, Mexico: Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Asociación Etnobiológica Mexicana y Sociedad Latinoamericana de Etnobiología, 18-23. 1Google Scholar
  505. Souza ACFF, Vieira DM, Teixeira SF: Trabalhadores da Maré: Conhecimento tradicional dos pescadores de moluscos na área urbana de Recife-PE. A Etnozoologia no Brasil: Importância, Status atual e Perspectivas. Edited by: Alves RRN, Souto WMS, Mourão JS. 2010, Recife, PE, Brazil: NUPEEA, 7: 149-176. 1Google Scholar
  506. Alves LCPS, Andriolo A: Caracterização preliminar do comércio ilegal de animais silvestres na Feira Livre do Bairro da Liberdade, Manacapuru, Estado do Pará. Sitientibus. 2010, 10: 236-243.Google Scholar

Copyright

© Alves and Souto; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2011

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.