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Table 3 Statistical analyses used to evaluate hypotheses on the use of edible plants in a local community in NE Brazil

From: I eat the manofê so it is not forgotten”: local perceptions and consumption of native wild edible plants from seasonal dry forests in Brazil

Hypothesis Variables Statistical test used
The most-consumed plants will be those that are perceived as tasting better. Number of citations of current use of plant x vs. Number of citations of pleasant flavor of plant x Pearson or Spearman correlation analysis
The most-consumed plants will be those that people perceive to be the most commercialized ones. Number of citations of current use of plant x vs. Number of people who cited plant x as being marketable Pearson or Spearman correlation analysis
Less-consumed plants will be those that are negatively perceived by the community. Number of citations of current use of plant x vs. Number of citations of negative perception of plant x Pearson or Spearman correlation analysis
Less-consumed plants will be those that are perceived as less abundant. Number of citations of current use of plant x vs. Number of citations of low abundance of plant x Pearson or Spearman correlation analysis
Less-consumed plants will be those that are perceived as less available. Number of citations of current use of plant x vs. Number of citations of low availability of plant x Pearson or Spearman correlation analysis
People with lower incomes will have more perceptions that encourage the use of wild edible plants. Monthly family income Simple linear regression analysis
Monthly individual income vs. Number of positive perceptions
People who perform agricultural activities in the community will have more perceptions that encourage the use of wild edible plants. Current occupation Contingency tables
Past occupation vs. Ratio of positive/negative perceptions
People with higher incomes will have more perceptions that limit the use of wild edible plants. Monthly family income Simple linear regression analysis
  Monthly individual income vs. Number of negative perceptions