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Table 4 Theoretical assumptions presented by works that established articulations between local and scientific knowledge

From: Local and scientific knowledge in the school context: characterization and content of published works

Theoretical assumptions (n = 72)aConcise definitionsRecovered worksReference(s) cited by the recovered work(s)N° of occurrences
MulticulturalismPedagogical movement in which the knowledge constructed by different types of cultures is treated fairly, with respect and recognition, and is taught in schools [70].El-Hani and Bandeira (2008) [71]
Horenczyk and Tatar (2002) [72]
McKinley (2005) [11]
Melo-Brito (2017) [73]
Niculae (2014) [74]
Pais (2011) [38]
Vargas (2017) [75]
Yore (2008) [57]
Eijck and Roth (2007) [47]1
Quilaqueo and Torres (2013) [76]2
Gondwe and Longnecker
(2015) [77]3
*
Stanley and Brickhouse (1994)1
Quilaqueo and Quintriqueo (2008), Quilaqueo (2012)2
Aikenhead (1996), Aikenhead and Jegede (1999)3
11
Vygotsky’s theory of learningEpistemology focused on the social construction of knowledge through interactive teaching and learning activities in the classroom [78].Chang, Lee and Yen (2010) [53]
Dopico and Garcia-Vazquez (2011) [79]
Mutekwe (2014) [80]
Mutekwe (2017) [78]
Nashon and Madera (2013) [81]
Sousa, Carvalho and Kambeba (2017) [44]
Govender (2011) [82]1
Owusu-mensah and Baffour (2015) [83]1,2
*
Vygotsky (1978)1
Derry (1999)2
08
Postcolonial theory (PCT)Area of cultural and critical theory that addresses the way in which the works written by colonizers distort the experience and reality of the colonized. This approach also shows the presence and identity of the colonized, claiming their lost or distorted past [84].El-Hani and Bandeira (2008) [71]
Glasson et al. (2010) [85]1
Gonye and Moyo (2015) [86]2
Mukhopadhyay (2015) [87]3
Nashon and Madera (2013) [81]4
Ninnes (2000) [88]5
*
Mapara (2009)4
Asante (1991)2
Goodley and Runswick-Cole (2010), Nelson and Prilleltensky (2005), Shakespeare (2013), Slee (2011)3
Gandhi (1998)5
Carter (2007), McKinley (2007)1
06
Critical pedagogyEducational movement based on an education that trains students with awareness of freedom and the ability to recognize authoritarian tendencies. This approach seeks to emphasize the connection between knowledge and power [89].Madusise and Mwakapenda (2014) [90]
Snively and Corsiglia (1997) [52]
Harris and Barter (2015) [91]1
Rincón and Olarte (2016) [39]2
Writer (2002) [92]3
*
Giroux (2010)1
Freire (2000)2
Freire (1992)3
05
Constructivist approachPedagogical perspective that considers the construction of knowledge as a process based on the learners’ previous ideas and which is organized based on their interactions with information available in the environment [9].Bejarano et al. (2014) [9]
Raina (2011) [93]
Stears, Malcolm and Kowlas (2003) [94]
Vhurumuku and Mokeleche (2009) [95]
*04
Toulmin’s (1958) Argumentation Pattern (TAP)Interdisciplinary study model that illustrates the characteristics of an argument based on claims, data, guarantees, supports and refutations [96].Hewson and Ogunniyi (2011) [97]
Ogunniyi (2007a) [98]
Ogunniyi (2007b) [99]
Ogunniyi (2011) [100]
Toulmin (1958)04
Cultural responsive pedagogyStudent centered teaching-learning process and its cultural context. The knowledge they bring to school is used to achieve better results [101].Babbitt et al. (2015) [102]
Coles-Ritchie, Monson and Moses (2015) [63]1,2
Rioux, Ewing and Cooper (2017) [103]5
*
Gay (2000)1
Ladson- Billings (1995)2
Barnhardt and Kawagley (2008)5
03
Culturally responsive educationTheoretical approach according to which a student’s learning process is influenced by their culture, context and everyday experiences [10].Augare et al. (2017) [104]
Mack (2012) [10]
Marker (2006) [105]
*03
Epistemological pluralismPhilosophical position that recognizes that there are other knowledge systems besides science, each having greater relevance over the others within its own system [6].Baptista (2010) [5]
Melo-Brito (2017) [73]
Taylor and Cameron (2016) [106]
*03
Third spaceSocially constructed, hybrid cultural spaces within which discourses and epistemologies can be articulated and deliberated through dialogue [107].Buendía et al (2004) [108]1
Stevenson (2015) [109]1
Glasson et al. (2010) [85]1
Bhabha (1994)103
InterculturalismModel for the integration and management of ethnocultural diversity [110]Melo-Brito (2017) [73]
Niculae (2014) [74]
Webb and Radcliffe (2016) [111]
*03
Culturally relevant pedagogyTheoretical model that seeks to encourage acceptance and affirmation of students’ cultural identity while developing critical perspectives [112].Mavuru and Ramnarain (2017) [113]1
Peña Sandoval (2016) [114]2
Weiland (2015)1
Paris (2012)2
02
Culturally responsive teaching (CRT)Teaching-learning process that seeks greater efficiency in the education of ethnically diverse students using their cultural characteristics, experiences and perspectives as channels [115].Rahmawati et al. (2017) [116]1
Rahmawati and Ridwan (2017) [117]1
Gay (2000)102
Community-based pedagogiesCurricula and practices that reflect the knowledge and understanding of the communities in which schools are located and where students and their families live [118].Sharkey, Olarte and Ramírez (2016) [64]1
Rincón and Olarte (2016) [39]2
Sharkey and Clavijo Olarte (2012a)1
Freire (2000), Clavijo (2015a), Medina, Ramírez and Clavijo (2015), Rincón (2014), Reyes (2012), Sharkey (2012)2
02
Cultural Border CrossingLearning process in which students start from the subcultures of their everyday worlds and move to the science subculture [119].Aikenhead (1997) [61]
Borgerding (2017) [120]
Aikenhead (1996)02
Culture-based educationApproach that aims to build and enhance students’ linguistic, cultural, cognitive and affective strengths [121].Yazzie-Mintz (2011) [122]
Kana’iapuni et al. (2017) [121]1
*
Demmert and Towner (2003)1.
02
Funds of knowledgeApproach based on the premise that people have culturally and historically accumulated knowledge in a body of knowledge and skills essential for their survival and well-being [123].Ewing (2014) [124]1
Rincón and Olarte (2016) [39]2
Moll (1992)1
Murrell (2001)2
02
PluralismPerspective that incorporates alternative forms of knowledge, supports local cultural and ecological preservation and values diversity [59].McKinley (2005) [11]
Avery and Hains (2017) [59]1
*
Kassan (2010)1
02
  1. The superscript numbers from the second column match the superscripts from the third column
  2. aOnly theoretical assumptions that were in more than one work with articulations between local and scientific knowledge in the school context were presented
  3. Source: Database searches of Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct and Scielo