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Table 4 Published sources supporting the exchange of information on medicinal plants

From: Exchange of medicinal plant information in California missions

1. Reports of an exchange of information
Comments Source
Native American teach priests about their medicinal plants (pp. 73-74) (example of exchange of information between Native Americans and priests) Anderson [26]
Compilation of medicinal plants by Father Garriga (pp. 443-445) (example of exchange of information between Californios and priests) Beebe and Senkewicz [43]
Father Crespi reports vineyard-like plantings by Native Americans (pp. 45) (example of exchange of information between Native Americans and priests) Blackburn and Anderson [62]
Sick sailors taken ashore in hope that medicinal herbs could be found (pp. 143) (example of the use of medicinal plant by Spanish explorers in California)
Dr. Prat searches for medicinal herbs after first ship land in San Diego (pp. 144) (example of the use of medicinal plant by Spanish explorers in California)
List of California plants identified by Portola (pp. 209-293) (example of interest in plants by Spanish explorers)
Brown [58]
Native American knowledge of medicinal plants (pp. 66) (example of exchange of information between Native Americans and priests) Boscana [63]
Junipero Serra’s leg treated by muleteer using local herbs (pp. 69) (example of exchange of information between Mestizo and priests)
Friars unable to reduce death rate even with help from Native American shaman (pp. 156) (example of exchange of information between Native Americans and priests)
Castillo [59]
Dr. Prat searches for medicinal herbs (pp. 14) (example of the use of medicinal plant by Spanish explorers in California) Engelhardt [64]
1812 survey of Missions asking about medicinal practices of Native Americans (example of exchange of information between Native Americans and priests) Geiger and Meighan [23]
Gardens at Mission Delores (pp.58) (example of garden at a Mission where both medicinal plants from Europe and California were grown together for medicinal purposes) Goerke [65]
Watercress reported at Mission San Gabriel (pp. 152) (example of medicinal plant native to both Spain and California observed at a Mission)
Father Font identifies flora (pp. 176) (example of priest identifying native plants in California and referencing them to plant species in Spain of medicinal value)
Anza becomes sick and is treated with medicinal (pp. 187) (example of exchange of information between Native American and Spanish explorers)
Guerrero [60]
Shared indigenous knowledge (pp. 33) (example of exchange of information between Native Americans and priests) Kryder-Reid [66]
Neophytes were sometimes dispatched by the priests to collect medicinal plants from the wild (p. 576) (example of exchange of information between Native Americans and priests) Engelhardt (1922)
At Mission San Jose the Native Americans retained their native customs (pp. 50-53) (example of Native Americans continuing their use of medicinal plants at the Missions) Milliken [67]
Continued practice of native medicine at Soledad Mission (pp. 119) (example of Native Americans continuing their use of medicinal plants at the Missions) Sandoz (2004)
Practice of herbal medicine (pp. 173) (example of Native Americans continuing their use of medicinal plants at the Missions)
Use of Datura toothache (pp. 175-178) (example of Native Americans continuing their use of medicinal plants at the Missions)
Use of horehound (pp. 180-181) (example of Native Americans continuing their use of medicinal plants at the Missions)
Timbrook [68]
Gardens at San Buenaventura (pp.86) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens) Webb [61]
Exchange of information about medicinal plants (pp.160-161) (example of exchange of information between Native Americans and priests) Weber [69]
2. Mission gardens and apothecary shops
Shaman cultivated medicinal herbs (pp. 44) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens) Blackburn and Anderson [62]
Seed imported from Mexico for Mission gardens (example of plants from a variety of sources being planted in Mission gardens) Brown [58]
San Carlos Mission garden (pp. 186) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens) Guerrero [60]
San Diego Mission gardens (pp. 36) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens) Kryder-Reid [66]
Mission San Buenaventura gardens (pp. 294) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens) Lamb [70]
San Luis Rey Mission gardens (pp. 96, 98) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens) Tac [71]
Native American gardens (pp. 60) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens)
Mission San Luis Rey gardens (pp. 76) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens)
Webb [61]
Domestication of native herbs (pp. 125) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens)
Apothecary shops (pp. 129-13) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens)
Native Americans encouraged to domesticate local plants (pp. 133) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens) Specialized gardens at different Missions (pp. 134)
Apothecary shops in all Missions (pp. 160) (example of Native American medicinal plants being planted in Mission gardens)
Weber [69]